THE MECHANICS MAGAZINE, JULY 1 - DECEMBER 30, 1854

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Page 418 - It is better, on this account, in graduating the bottle, to make two scratches as represented in the drawing, one at the top and the other at the bottom of the curve : this prevents any future mistake.
Page 109 - And it is to be hoped the day is not far distant when the farmers who allow thistles, ragweed, and the like, to seed on their fields, without having attempted to prevent them, will be subjected to a penalty •f.
Page 291 - Ireland and Cape St. Charles, or Cape St. Lewis, in Labrador, is somewhat less than the distance from any point of Ireland to the nearest point of Newfoundland. But whether it would be better to lead the wires from Newfoundland or Labrador, is not now the question ; nor do I pretend to consider the question as to the possibility of finding a time calm enough, the sea smooth enough, a wire long enough, a ship big enough...
Page 291 - ... the bottom of the deep sea is concerned. From Newfoundland to Ireland, the distance between the nearest points is about 1,600 miles;* and the bottom of the sea between the two places is a plateau, which seems to have been placed there especially for the purpose of holding the wires of a submarine telegraph, and of keeping them out of harm's way. It is neither too deep nor too shallow ; yet it is so deep that the wires, but once landed, will remain forever beyond the reach of vessels...
Page 468 - Engine be not used or employed therein), shall in all cases be constructed or altered so as to consume or burn the Smoke arising from such Furnace...
Page 294 - ... dynamic relations of electricity ; every current where there is resistance, has the static element and induction involved in it, whilst every case of insulation has more or less of the dynamic element and conduction ; and we have seen that with the same voltaic source, the same current in the same length of the same wire, gives a different result as the intensity is made to vary, with variations of the induction around the wire.
Page 294 - To sum up, in some degree, what has been said, I look upon the first effect of an excited body upon neighbouring matters to be the production of a polarized state of their particles, which constitutes induction ; and this arises from its action upon the particles in immediate contact with it, which again act upon those contiguous to them, and thus the forces are transferred to a distance. If the induction remain undiminished, then perfect insulation is the consequence ; and the higher the polarized...
Page 177 - I would depreciate (were it possible to depreciate) the mechanical ingenuity which has been displayed in the erection of the Crystal Palace, or that I underrate the effect which its vastness may continue to produce on the popular imagination. But mechanical ingenuity is not the essence either of painting or architecture: and largeness of dimension does not necessarily involve nobleness of design. There is assuredly as much ingenuity required to build a screw frigate, or a tubular bridge, as a hall...
Page 133 - Practical Surveyor's Guide: Containing the necessary information to make any person, of common capacity, a finished land surveyor without the aid of a teacher.
Page 294 - These terms, or equivalents for them, cannot be dispensed with by those who study both the static and the dynamic relations of electricity ; every current where there is resistance has the static element and induction involved in it, whilst every case of insulation has more or less of the dynamic element and conduction ; and we have seen that...

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