Dracula

Front Cover
For generations, readers have enjoyed classic literature. They have delighted in the romance of Jane Austen, thrilled at the adventures of Jules Verne, and pondered the lessons of Aesop. Introduce young readers to these familiar volumes with Great Illustrated Classics. In this series, literary masterworks have been adapted for young scholars. Large, easy-to-read type and charming pen-and-ink drawings enhance the text. Students are sure to enjoy becoming acquainted with traditional literature through these well-loved classics.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - lkmuir - LibraryThing

After discovering the double identity of the wealthy Transylvanian nobleman, Count Dracula, a small group of people vow to rid the world of the evil vampire. Illustrated notes throughout the text explain the historical background of the story. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - KR_Patterson - LibraryThing

I was hesitant to read this because I was afraid it would forever alter my idea of the immortalized Dracula in ways I didn't want it to (because I love my notions of all the original monsters), and ... Read full review

Contents

Hall of Horrors 4 Friends with Secrets
4
Storm at
5
A Letter at Last
6
The Mysterious Illness
7
A Life to Save
8
The Howl of the Wolf
9
Deaths Kiss
10
Dracula in London
11
A Terrible Accident
14
Mina in Danger
15
On Draculas Trail
16
Back to Transylvania
17
Closing
18
The Final Battle
19
PAGE
21
16
31

The UnDead
12
Vampires
13

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About the author (2005)

Bram Stoker was born in Dublin, Ireland on November 8, 1847. He was educated at Trinity College. He worked as a civil servant and a journalist before becoming the personal secretary of the famous actor Henry Irving. He wrote 15 works of fiction including Dracula, The Lady of the Shroud, and The Lair of the White Worm, which was made into film. He died on April 20, 1912.

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