Minutes of Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers, Volume 83

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Vols. 39-204 (1874/75-1916/17) have a section 3 containing "Abstracts of papers in foreign transactions and periodicals" (title varies); issued separately, 1919-37, as the institution's Engineering abstracts from the current periodical literature of engineering and applied science, published outside the United Kingdom.
 

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Page 308 - Where the masonry was of the best class, and such as would be so recognized in England, the buildings thus constructed stood uninjured in the midst of chaotic ruin. Some examples of this will be found in the second part, none more striking than the Campanile of Atena, a square tower of 90 feet in height and 22 feet square at the base, in which there was not even a fissure while nearly...
Page 8 - ... extreme distance, a ratio equal to the sine of the inclination of the curve it is describing at the instant, to the atmospheric-line. The effect of this alone on a rectangular diagram would be to round off the corners as in Fig. 3. With an early cut off, the effect would be as shown in Fig. 4. Fig. 4. The friction of the mechanism causes the pencil to be behind its true position by a nearly constant quantity, and hence during expansion and exhaust the pencil will be too high, and during compression...
Page 308 - ... generally been substantially and well built or rather the materials scientifically put together, very few buildings would have actually been shaken down even in those localities where the shocks were most violent. Thus the frightful loss of life and limb were as much to be attributed to the ignorance and imperfection displayed in the domestic architecture of the people, as to the unhappy natural condition of their country as regards earthquakes.
Page 430 - Engineers, of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, and of the Iron and Steel Institute...
Page 9 - The conclusions, then, as regards the motion of the pencil, are, that the general effects of inertia and friction are both to increase the size of the diagram ; that so long as the speeds are such that n is not greater than 15, the effect of inertia is less than 1 per cent., but that if n is less than 30, oscillations will show themselves unless the pencil-friction be increased.
Page 10 - The effect of the obliquity of the connecting-rod would be to increase n=30 n = 15 69 138 85 170 99 198 105 210 120 240 130 260 139 278 147 294 155 310 this elongation at the back-end and diminish it at the front, increasing the area of the back-end diagram, and diminishing that of the front somewhat, but it is small unless the connecting...
Page 404 - They dip at an angle of from 20 to 40, and are composed of sand, calcareous clays, marls, and in places compact sandstone, often of great thickness. Organic remains are wholly absent. The naphtha-bearing sands are in a semi-fluid condition, and, when brought to the surface, give off carburetted-hydrogen gas. Not only do these sands give much trouble, but the salt water associated with them makes the driving of bore-wells difficult. The plateau...
Page 6 - ... smallness of the number in a revolution. But the evil of these oscillations was not so much an effect on the area as in the disfigurement and the confusion they produced in the diagram. So long as there were thirty of these oscillations in a cycle, the necessary fluid friction of the indicator piston would so far reduce them as to render a fair diagram possible, but when the number was as low as ten it was all the pencil could do to prevent them upsetting the diagram. The friction arising from...
Page 285 - MOTION. 7. Among the experiments made to measure the relative motion of different parts of a building, a few were carried on at the Imperial College of Engineering, which is a heavy, solid structure of brick and stone. One set of experiments was made upon the archways of two corridors. These arches have a span of 8 feet 3 inches, a rise of 4 feet...

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