The expedition of Humphry Clinker. By the author of Roderick Random, Volume 1

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Sterling & Slade, 1820 - 564 pages
 

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Page 122 - What are the amusements at Ranelagh ? One half of the company are following one another's tails, in an eternal circle, like so many blind asses in an olive-mill, where they can neither discourse, distinguish, nor be distinguished ; while the other half are drinking hot water, under the denomination of tea, till nine or ten o'clock at night, to keep them awake for the rest of the evening.
Page iv - While the warm blood bedews my veins, And unimpair'd remembrance reigns, Resentment of my country's fate Within my filial breast shall beat ; And, spite of her insulting foe, My sympathizing verse shall flow : " Mourn, hapless Caledonia, mourn " Thy banish'd peace, thy laurels torn.
Page 50 - Bath, contrived without judgment, executed without solidity, and stuck together with so little regard to plan and propriety, that the different lines of the new rows and buildings interfere with and intersect one another in every different angle of conjunction. They look like the wreck of streets and squares disjointed by an earthquake...
Page xiii - The learned SMELFUNGUS travelled from Boulogne to Paris from Paris to Rome and so on but he set out with the spleen and jaundice, and every object he pass'd by was discoloured or distorted He wrote an account of them, but 'twas nothing but the account of his miserable feelings.
Page 119 - What I left open fields, producing hay and corn, I now find covered with streets and squares, and palaces and churches. I am credibly informed, that, in the space of seven years, eleven thousand new houses have been built in one quarter of Westminster, exclusive of what is daily added to other parts of this unwieldy metropolis.
Page 127 - Tenducci, a thing from Italy — It looks for all the world like a man, though they say it is not. The voice, to be sure, is neither man's nor woman's, but it is 'more melodious than either; and it warbled so divinely that, while I listened, I really thought myself in paradise.
Page 53 - The eye is continually entertained with the splendour of dress and equipage ; and the ear with the sound of coaches, chaises, chairs, and other carriages.
Page 189 - What right has such a fellow as you to set up for a reformer ?—Begging your honour's pardon, replied Clinker, may not the new light of God's grace, shine upon the poor and the ignorant in their humility, as well as upon the wealthy and the philosopher in all his pride of human learning...
Page 4 - Then there have been so many letters upon travels lately published — What between Smollett's, Sharp's, Derrick's, Thickness's, Baltimore's, and Baretti's, together with Shandy's Sentimental Travels, the public seems to be cloyed with that kind of entertainment...
Page 52 - This, I own, is a subject on which I cannot write with any degree of patience ; for the mob is a monster I never could abide, either in its head, tail, midriff, or members : I detest the whole of it, as a mass of ignorance, presumption, malice, and brutality...

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