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So passion is to woman's love, about,
Nay, further off, than when we first set out.
It is not love, that sues or doth contend;
Love either conquers, or but meets a friend.
Man's better part consists of purer fire,
And finds itself allow’d, ere it desire.
Love is wise here, keeps home, gives reason sway,
And journies not till it find summer-way.
A weather-beaten lover, but once known,
is sport for every girl to practise on. [know,
Who strives through woman's scorns women to
Is lost, and seeks his shadow to outgo;
It is mere sickness after one disdain,
Though he be call’d aloud, to look again.
Let others sin and grieve ; one cunning sleight
shall freeze my love to crystal in a night.
I can love first, and (if I win) love still;
And cannot be remov’d, unless she will.
It is her fault, if I unsure remain ;
She only can untie, I bind again.
The honesties of love with ease I do,
But am no porter for a tedious woe.

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If her disdain least change in you can move,
You do not love;
For when that hope gives fuel to the fire,
You sell desire.
Love is not love, but given free;
And so is mine, so should yours be.

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I can Nor feel the tempest of a frown,
I may be rais'd by love, but not thrown down;
Though I can pity those sigh twice a day,
I hate that thing whispers itself away.
Yet since all love is feverish, who to trees
Doth talk, yet doth in love's cold ague freeze.
'Tis love, but with such fatal weakness made,
That it destroys itself with its own shade. [pain,
Who first look'd sad, griev'd, pin'd, and show'd his
Was he that first taught women to disdain.
As all things were but one nothing, dull and weak,
Until this raw disorder'd heap did break,
And several desires led parts away,
Water declin’d with earth, the air did stay,
Fire rose, and each from other but unty’d,
Themselves unprison'd were and purify'd :
So was love, first in vast confusion hid,
An unripe willingness which nothing did,
A thirst, an appetite which had no ease,
That found a want, but knew not what would please.
What pretty innocence in that day mov’d
Man ignorantly walk’d by her he lov'd :
Both sigh’d and interchang'd a speaking eye,
Both trembled and were sick, yet knew not why.
That natural fearfulness, that struck man dumb,
Might well (those times consider'd) man become.
As all discoverers, whose first essay
Finds but the place; after, the nearest way:

So passion is to woman's love, about,
Nay, further off, than when we first set out.
It is not love, that sues or doth contend;
Love either conquers, or but meets a friend.
Man's better part consists of purer fire,
And finds itself allow’d, ere it desire.
Love is wise here, keeps home, gives reason sway,
And journies not till it find summer-way.
A weather-beaten lover, but once known,
Is sport for every girl to practise on. [know,
Who strives through woman's scorns women to
Is lost, and seeks his shadow to outgo;
It is mere sickness after one disdain,
Though he be call’d aloud, to look again.
Let others sin and grieve; one cunning sleight
Shall freeze my love to crystal in a night.
I can love first, and (if I win) love still;
And cannot be remov’d, unless she will.
It is her fault, if I unsure remain ;
She only can untie, I bind again.
The honesties of love with ease I do,
But am no porter for a tedious woe.

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If her disdain least change in you can move,
You do not love;
For when that hope gives fuel to the fire,
You sell desire.
Love is not love, but given free :
And so is mine, so should yours be.

Her heart, that melts to hear of other's moan,
To mine is stone;
Her eyes, that weep a stranger's eyes to see,
Joy to wound me:
Yet I so well affect each part,
As (caus’d by them) I love my smart.

Say her disdainings justly must be grac'd
With name of chaste;
And that she frowns, lest longing should exceed,
And raging breed;
So her disdains can ne’er offend;
Unless self-love take private end.

'Tis love breeds love in me, and cold disdain
Kills that again;
As water causeth fire to fret and fume,
Till all consume.
Who can of love more rich gift make,
Than to love’s self for love’s own sake 2

I’ll never dig in quarry of an heart,
To have no part;
Nor roast in fiery eyes, which always are
Canicular.
Who this way would a lover prove,
May show his patience, not his love.

A frown may be sometimes for physic good,
But not for food;
And for that raging humour there is sure
A gentler cure.
Why bar you love of private end,
Which never should to public tend ?

To the
COUNTESS OF S.A.LISBURY.

August, 1614.

FAIR, great, and good, since seeing you we see
What Heav'n can do, what any earth can be:
Since now your beauty shines, now when the Sun,
Grown stale, is to so low a value run,
That his dishevel’d beams and scatter'd fires
Serve but for ladies' periwigs and tires
In lovers' sonnets: you come to repair
God's book of creatures, teaching what is fair.
Since now, when all is wither'd, shrunk, and dry'd,
All virtues ebb'd out to a dead low tide,
All the world’s frame being crumbled into sand,
Where ev'ry man thinks by himself to stand,
Integrity, friendship, and confidence,
(Cements of greatness) being vapour'd hence,
And narrow man being fill'd with little shares,
Courts, city, church, are all shops of small-wares,
All having blown to sparks their noble fire,
And drawn their sound gold ingot into wire;
All trying by a love of littleness
To make abridgments and to draw to less,
Even that nothing, which at first we were;
Since in these times your greatness doth appear,
And that we learn by it, that man, to get
Towards him that's infinite, must first be great.
Since in an age so ill, as none is fit
So much as to accuse, much less mend it,

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