One L

Front Cover
Putnam, 1977 - Law - 300 pages
"A wonderful book...it should be read by anyone who has ever contemplated going to law school. Or anyone who has ever worried about being human."--The New York Times

It was a year of terrors and triumphs, of depressions and elations, of compulsive work, pitiless competition, and, finally, mass hysteria. It was Scott Turow's first year at the oldest, biggest, most esteemed center of legal education in the United States. Turow's experiences at Harvard Law School, where freshmen are dubbed One Ls, parallel those of first-year law students everywhere. His gripping account of this critical, formative year in the life of a lawyer is as suspenseful, said The New York Times, as "the most absorbing of thrillers."

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User Review  - JenniferRobb - LibraryThing

Literature professor and published author, Scott Turow, decides that he liked the research for his book so much that he will attend law school. He chooses the venerated Harvard Law School and ... Read full review

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User Review  - AlanWPowers - LibraryThing

Must disagree with the jacket/ GoodReads blurb, "entirely true." NOT according to one of his undergrad professors, Theodore Baird, who wondered how Turow could present himself as such a blank slate ... Read full review

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About the author (1977)

Scott Turow is a writer and lawyer. He was born in Chicago, Illinois, on April 12, 1949. He received a B.A. from Amherst College in 1970 and an M.A. from Stanford University in 1974. He graduated from Harvard Law School in 1978. He was an Assistant United States Attorney in Chicago and served as a prosecutor in several corruption cases. Turow continues to work as an attorney. He has written numerous novels including Presumed Innocent, The Burden of Proof, Pleading Guilty, The Laws of Our Fathers, Personal Injuries, Ordinary Heroes, Limitations, Innocent, and Identical. His non-fiction works include One L about his experience as a law student and Ultimate Punishment about the death penalty. He has won numerous awards including the Heartland Prize in 2003 for Reversible Errors, the Robert F. Kennedy Book Award in 2004 for Ultimate Punishment, and Time Magazine's Best Work of Fiction, 1999 for Personal Injuries. He will give a keynote speech at the National writer's Congress 2015.

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