The Paranoid Style in American Politics: And Other Essays

Front Cover
Acclaimed historian Richard Hofstadter's classic work on the fringe groups that influence American electoral politics offers an invaluable perspective on contemporary domestic affairs. Hofstadter examines the competing forces in American political discourse and how fringe groups can influence--and derail--the larger agendas of a political party. He investigates the politics of the irrational, shedding light on how the behavior of individuals can seem out of proportion with actual political issues, and how such behavior impacts larger groups. With such other classic essays as "Free Silver and the Mind of 'Coin' Harvey" and "What Happened to the Antitrust Movement?" The Paranoid Style in American Politics remains both a seminal text of political history and a vital analysis of the ways in which political groups function in the United States.--From publisher description of reprint.

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User Review  - HadriantheBlind - LibraryThing

Six decades past publication, it is remarkable how much Hofstadter's analyses the conservative fringe have retained their lucidity, not least because the circumstances between then and now are too ... Read full review

THE PARANOID STYLE IN AMERICAN POLITICS

User Review  - Kirkus

Professor Hofstadter's last work, Anti-intellectualism in American Life. received the Pulitzer Prize and a few other choice awards. It was one of the bright events of 1963, though not everyone was ... Read full review

Contents

The Paranoid Style in American Politics
3
The PseudoConservative Revolt1954
41
PseudoConservatism Revisited1965
66
Copyright

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About the author (1965)

DeWitt Clinton Professor of History at Columbia University from 1959 until the time of his death, Richard Hofstadter was one of the most influential historians in post--World War II America. His political, social, and intellectual histories raised serious questions about assumptions that had long been taken for granted and cast the American experience in an interesting new light. His 1948 work, The American Political Tradition, is an enduring classic study in political history. His 1955 work, The Age of Reform, which still commands respect among both historians and general readers, won him that year's Pulitzer Prize. A measure of Hofstadter's standing in literary and scholarly circles is the honors he received in 1964 for Anti-Intellectualism in American Life (1963)---Pulitzer Prize for general nonfiction, the Ralph Waldo Emerson Prize of Phi Beta Kappa, and the Sidney Hillman Prize Award. Hofstadter's greatest talent, however, may have been his ability to order complex events and issues and to synthesize from them a rational, constructively critical perspective on American history.

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