Paradise lost, book i., ed. with intr. and notes by F. Storr

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Page 14 - At once as far as angels ken he views The dismal situation waste and wild A dungeon horrible, on all sides round As one great furnace flamed, yet from those flames No light, but rather darkness visible Served only to discover sights of woe...
Page 13 - Muse, that on the secret top Of Oreb, or of Sinai, didst inspire That Shepherd, who first taught the chosen seed, In the beginning, how the Heavens and Earth Rose out of Chaos : Or, if Sion hill Delight thee more, and Siloa's brook that flow'd Fast by the oracle of God ; I thence Invoke thy aid to my adventurous song, That with no middle flight intends to soar Above the Aonian mount, while it pursues Things unattempted yet in prose or rhyme.
Page 16 - Extort from me. To bow and sue for grace With suppliant knee, and deify his power Who from the terror of this arm so late Doubted his empire, that were low indeed; That were an ignominy and shame beneath This downfall; since by fate the strength of gods And this empyreal* substance cannot fail...
Page 28 - There went a fame in heaven that he, ere long, Intended to create, and therein plant A generation, whom his choice regard Should favour equal to the sons of heaven : Thither, if but to pry, shall be, perhaps...
Page 30 - From heaven, they fabled, thrown by angry Jove Sheer o'er the crystal battlements : from morn To noon he fell, from noon to dewy eve, A summer's day ; and with the setting sun Dropt from the zenith like a falling star...
Page 20 - He scarce had ceased, when the superior fiend Was moving toward the shore : his ponderous shield, Ethereal temper, massy, large, and round, Behind him cast ; the broad circumference Hung on his shoulders like the moon, whose orb Through optic glass the Tuscan artist views, At evening, from the top of Fesole, Or in Valdarno, to descry new lands, Rivers, or mountains, in her spotty globe.
Page 21 - They heard, and were abash'd, and up they sprung Upon the wing ; as when men, wont to watch On duty, sleeping found by whom they dread, Rouse and bestir themselves ere well awake.
Page 17 - As being the contrary to his high will Whom we resist. If then his providence Out of our evil seek to bring forth good...
Page 17 - Fallen Cherub, to be weak is miserable, Doing or suffering; but of this be sure, To do aught good never will be our task, But ever to do ill our sole delight, As being the contrary to his high will Whom we resist.
Page 15 - What though the field be lost? All is not lost; the unconquerable will, And study of revenge, immortal hate, And courage never to submit or yield: And what is else not to be overcome?

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