Philosophical essays; in letters to the Royal society

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 174 - ... to derive two or three general principles of motion from phenomena, and afterwards to tell us how the properties and actions of all corporeal things follow from those manifest principles, would be a very great step in philosophy, though the causes of those principles were not yet discovered...
Page 117 - It seems also to follow from the Production of Air and Vapour. The Particles when they are shaken off from Bodies by Heat or Fermentation, so soon as they are beyond the reach of the Attraction of the Body, receding from it, and...
Page 117 - And that there is such a virtue seems to follow from the reflections and inflections of the rays of light. For the rays are repelled by bodies in both these cases without the immediate contact of the reflecting or inflecting body. It seems also to follow from the emission of light, the ray, so soon as it is shaken...
Page 118 - Strength, and keeping at a distance, so as sometimes to take up above a Million of Times more space than they did before in the form of a dense Body. Which vast Contraction and Expansion seems unintelligible , by feigning the Particles of Air to be springy and ramous, or rolled up like Hoops, or by any other means than a repulsive Power.
Page v - Electric atmospheres that flow round non-electric bodies, being brought near each other, do not readily mix and unite into one atmosphere, but remain separate and repel each other.
Page vi - An electric atmosphere not only repels another electric atmosphere, but will also repel the electric matter contained in the substance of a body approaching it ; and, without joining or mixing with it, force it to other parts of the body that contained it. This is shown by some of the following experiments.
Page 117 - Body by the vibrating Motion of the Parts of the Body, and gets beyond the reach of Attraction, being driven away with exceeding great Velocity. For that Force which is sufficient to turn it back in Reflexion, may be sufficient to emit it.
Page 117 - Particles when they are fhaken off from Bodies by Heat or Fermentation, 'fo foon as they are beyond the reach of the Attraction of the Body, receding from it, and alfo from one another with great...
Page 118 - Smallriefs as renders them moft fufceptible of thofe Agitations which keep Liquors in .a Fluor, are moft ealily feparated and rarified into Vapour, and in the Language of the Chymifts, they. are volatile, rarifying with an eafy Heat, and condenfmg with Cold. But thofe which are...
Page 118 - Air to be fpringy and ramous, or rolled up like Hoops, or. by any other means than a repulfive Power. The Particles of Fluids which do not cohere too ftrongly, and are of fuch a...

Bibliographic information