The Jamaican People, 1880-1902: Race, Class, and Social Control

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University of the West Indies Press, 2000 - History - 300 pages
A description of the period in Jamaica's history that follows the abolition of slavery, up to the introduction of universal adult suffrage. The author analyzes the social, intellectual and political history of the era, including health, law, labour, and the ideas of the black intelligentsia.
 

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Contents

The plantation economy
1
Crown Colony government
11
Law and order
22
Nuttall and the religious orientation
33
The ranks of society
67
Marriage and family
92
Childhood youth and education
110
Peasants tenants and wagelabourers
131
Leisure and class in latenineteenth century Jamaica
191
The black middle class
216
The black intelligentsia
239
Riots and social disturbances
266
Epilogue
278
Bibliography
283
Articles
290
Index
293

Health and poor relief
161

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About the author (2000)

Patrick E. Bryan is the Douglas Hall Professor of History, University of the West Indies, Jamaica. His publications include The Haitian Revolution and Its Effects; Philanthropy and Social Welfare in Jamaica; The Jamaican People, 1880-1902; Jamaica: The Aviation Story; The Legacy of a Goldsmith: A History of Wolmer's Schools; Inside Out and Outside In: Factors in the Creation of Contemporary Jamaica. He is also the co-editor (with Rupert Lewis) of Marcus Garvey: His Work and Impact and (with Karl Watson) of Not for Wages: Eyewitness Summaries of the 1938 Labour Rebellion in Jamaica.

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