A Journey Over Land to India: Partly by a Route Never Gone Before by Any European

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Page 164 - The discovery which they made amply compensated for this mischief; as, without their evidence, the world would not have known at this hour that there was originally a statue on this pillar, one foot and ancle of which are still remaining.
Page 92 - Whatever withdraws us from the power of our senses; whatever makes the past, the distant, or the future predominate over the present, advances us in the dignity of thinking beings. Far from me and from my friends, be such frigid philosophy as may conduct us indifferent and unmoved over any ground which has been dignified by wisdom, bravery, or virtue. That man is little to be envied, whose patriotism would not gain force upon the plain of Marathon, or whose piety would not grow warmer among the ruins...
Page 43 - Commov'd around, in gathering eddies play: Nearer and nearer ftill they darkening come ; Till, with the general all-involving ftorm Swept up, the whole continuous wilds arife ; And by their noon-day fount dejefted thrown, Or funk at night in fad difaftrous fleep, Beneath defcending hills, the caravan Is buried deep.
Page 45 - Having thus, with equal zeal and fidelity, endeavoured to imprefs me with veneration for his Lord and Mafter , and for that purpofe attributed to him every perfection that may be fuppofed. to be divided among all the Kings...
Page 24 - There is but one GOD, and MAHOMET is his " Prophet ;" but upon this they have fuperinduced, from time to time, fuch...
Page 18 - Hall had got upon the capstan, and was waving his hand to me to follow his example : this I wished to do, though it was an enterprise of...
Page 92 - Far from me and from my friends, be fuch frigid philofophy as may conduit us indifferent and unmoved over any ground which has been dignified by wifdom, bravery, or virtue. That man is little to be envied, whofe patriotifm would not gain force upon the plain of Marathon, or whofe piety would not grow warmer among the ruins of lona ? We came too late to vifit monuments : fome care was neceflary • for ourfelves.
Page 94 - ... down the corners of his mouth in the moft rueful manner, and give a loud whew ! with his eyes fixed in a ftare at me, till entirely overcome with laughter, and ready to...
Page 12 - ... more formidable. By day-light on the morning of the twentieth, the gale had increafed to a furious tempeft ; and the fea, keeping pace with it, ran mountain-high ; and as it kept invariably to the fame point, the Captain and Officers became ferioufly alarmed, and almoft perfuaded that the...
Page 82 - I revolved a thousand things, and drew from them a thousand surmises; but all as yet was only conjecture with me. In a day or two, the bustle increased to a high pitch, accompanied with marks of consternation : the whole of the troops in the citadel were ordered to march ; and the commandant, and a man with a hammer and instruments, came to take off my irons. ' While they were at work taking off my irons, I perceived that they were taking off those of the native prisoner opposite to me also.

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