Contemporary Views on the Holocaust

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Springer Science & Business Media, Jul 31, 1983 - History - 237 pages
This book is the second in a series of studies published under the auspices of the Institute for Holocaust Studies of the Graduate School and U niver sity Center of The City University of New York. Like the first book, it is an outgrowth of the lectures and special studies sponsored by the institute during the 1981-82 and 1982-83 academic years. This volume is divided into five parts. Part I, Ethics and the Holocaust, contains a pioneering investigation of one of the most neglected areas in Holocaust studies. Francine Klagsbrun, a well-known writer and popular lecturer, provides an erudite overview of the value of life in Jewish thought and tradition. With full understanding of the talmudic scholars' position on Jewish ethics and using concrete examples of the life-and death dilemmas that confronted many Jews in their concentration camp experiences, Klagsbrun provides dramatic evidence of the triumph of moral and ethical principles over the forces of evil during the Holocaust, this darkest period in Jewish history. The next two chapters, grouped under the heading The Allies and the Holocaust, deal with the failure of the Western Allies to respond to the desperate needs of the persecuted Jews of Europe during the Second World War. The first is by Professor Bela Vago, an authority on the Holocaust and East Central European history at the University of Haifa.
 

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Contents

III
3
IV
21
V
23
VI
47
VII
77
VIII
79
IX
109
X
141
XI
143
XIII
155
XIV
179
XVI
181
XVII
199
XVIII
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XIX
233
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About the author (1983)

Randolph Louis Braham was born Adolf Abraham in Bucharest, Romania on December 20, 1922. After Hungary seized control of the region in 1940, Braham was barred from public high school because he was Jewish. His parents registered him at an independent school, where he could complete assignments without attending classes. From 1943 to 1945, he was forced to serve in a Hungarian army slave labor battalion in Ukraine. Captured by the Soviets, he escaped and was sheltered by a Hungarian Christian farmer. After the war, he served as a translator for the United States Army. He emigrated to the United States in 1948 and became a citizen in 1953. He received a bachelor's degree in economics and government, a master of science degree in education from City College, and a doctorate in political science from the New School for Social Research. He taught comparative politics and Soviet studies at City College from 1962 until 1992. He founded the Rosenthal Institute for Holocaust Studies there in 1979. He wrote or edited more than 60 books during his lifetime including The Politics of Genocide: The Holocaust in Hungary and the three-volume The Geographical Encyclopedia of the Holocaust in Hungary. He died from heart failure on November 25, 2018 at the age of 95.

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