The Aeneid of Virgil

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Armstrong, 1886 - 482 pages
 

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Page 205 - And calls a court of those below, The life of each intent to learn And what the cause that wrought them woe. Next comes their portion in the gloom Who guiltless sent themselves to doom, And all for loathing of the day In madness threw their lives away...
Page 136 - Nor, when to humbling peace at length He stoops, be his or life or land, But let him fall in manhood's strength And welter tombless on the sand. Such malison to heaven I pour, A last libation with my gore. And, Tyrians, you through time to come His seed with deathless hatred chase : Be that your gift to Dido's tomb : No love, no league 'twixt race and race. Rise from my ashes, scourge of crime, Born to pursue the Dardan horde To-day, to-morrow, through all time, Oft as our hands can wield the sword...
Page 219 - A fiery strength inspires their lives, An essence that from heaven derives, Though clogged in part by limbs of clay, And the dull "vesture of decay...
Page 15 - ... was obtained, so great a desire of glory took possession of them, that liberty alone was not enough unless domination also should be sought, their great ambition being that which the same poet puts into the mouth of Jupiter: Nay, Juno's self, whose wild alarms Set ocean, earth, and heaven in arms, Shall change for smiles her moody frown, And vie with me in zeal to crown Rome's sons, the nation of the gown. So stands my will. There comes a day, While Rome's great ages hold their way, When old...
Page 142 - Africa, is driven by a storm on the coasts of Sicily, where he is hospitably received by his friend Acestes, king of part of the island, and born of Trojan parentage. He applies himself to celebrate the memory of his father with divine honours, and accordingly institutes funeral games, and appoints prizes for those who should conquer in them. While the ceremonies...
Page 138 - Takes up the Dardan sword and bares—• Sad gift, for different uses meant. She eyed the robes with wistful look, And pausing, thought awhile and wept; Then pressed her to the couch and spoke Her last, good-night or ere she slept. ' Sweet relics of a time of love, When fate and heaven were kind, Receive my life-blood, and remove These torments of the mind. My life is lived, and I have played The part that Fortune gave, And now I pass, a queenly shade, Majestic to the grave. A glorious city I have...
Page 223 - neath heaven's high dome. This, this is he, so oft the theme Of your prophetic fancy's dream, Augustus Caesar, Jove's own strain ; Restorer of the age of gold In lands where Saturn ruled of old : O'er Ind and Garamant extreme Shall stretch his boundless reign. Look to that land which lies afar Beyond the path of sun or star, Where Atlas on his shoulder rears The burden of the incumbent spheres. Egypt e'en now and Caspia hear The muttered voice of many a seer, And Nile's seven mouths, disturbed with...
Page 15 - MycensD reign, And humble Argos to their chain. From Troy's fair stock shall Caesar rise, The limits of whose victories Are ocean, of his fame the skies ; Great Julius, proud that style to bear, In name and blood lulus
Page 220 - Each for himself, we all sustain The durance of our ghostly pain ; Then to Elysium we repair, The few, and breathe this blissful air : Till, many a length of ages past, • The inherent taint is cleansed at last, And nought remains but ether bright, The quintessence of heavenly light.
Page 259 - Twas thus they bade the king proclaim Fierce war against the Trojan name, And ope the gates of doom : The good old sire with hand and eye Shrank from the hated ministry And deeper plunged in gloom. When lo ! in person from above Descends the imperial spouse of Jove, Smote the barred gates, and backward rolled On jarring hinge each bursten fold. Ausonia, all inert before, Takes fire and blazes to the core : And some on foot their march essay, Some, mounted, storm along the way ; To arms ! cry one...

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