History of the County of Fife: From the Earliest Period to the Present Time, Volume 3

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J. Swan, 1840 - Fife (Scotland)
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This book, that was written back in 1840 is 100% inaccurate. It says that Robert Bruce of Earlshall's daughter Margaret Bruce had no children. 100% wrong. They did and three of their sons came to America... I should know, I am a direct decedent of one of their sons.

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Page 36 - ... men and three yeomen chosen to shoot against the English-men, to wit, David Wemyss of that ilk, David Arnot of that ilk, and Mr. John Wedderburn, vicar of Dundee; the yeomen, John Thomson, in Leith, Steven Taburner, with a piper, called Alexander Bailie; they shot very near, and warred [worsted] the English-men of the enterprise, and wan the hundred crowns and the tun of wine, which made the king very merry that his men wan the victory.
Page 138 - Andrew laughing at him for it, he did beat him twice with a stafe ; he confest also, that he had spoken very ill words concerning his brothers, and particularly he challenged his eldest brother John to a combate, as he called it, of...
Page 31 - One of its streets is now lost; and in those that remain, there is the silence and solitude of inactive indigence and gloomy depopulation.
Page 138 - Alexander Selcraig, according to the session's appointment, compeared before the pulpit, and made acknowledgment of his sin in disagreeing with his brothers, and was rebuked in the face of the congregation for it, and promised amendment in the strength of the Lord, and so was dismissed.
Page 245 - Sainct Coomes Ins, which standeth a iiii mile beyond Lieth, and a good way ner at the north shore than the south, yet not within a mile of the nerest. It is but half a myle about, and hath in it a pretty abbey (but ye monks were gone), fresh water enough, and also coonyes; and is so naturally strong, as but one way it can be entered. The plot whearof my Lordes Grace considering, did quickly cast to have it kept, whearby all traffik of merchandise, all commodities els...
Page 172 - ... the same mode of transportation, conveyed him to Leith sands, and set down the astonished judge on the very spot where he had taken him up. The joy of his friends, and the less agreeable surprise of his successor, may be easily conceived, when he appeared in court, to reclaim his office and honours. All embraced his own persuasion, that he had been spirited away by witchcraft ; nor could he himself be convinced of the contrary, until, many years afterwards, happening to travel in Annandale, his...
Page 120 - An account of the affairs of Scotland, relating to the revolution in 1688.
Page 162 - The Scottish surname of Wemyss, from the Gaelic word uamh, a cave, was derived from lands now forming the parish of that name in Fifeshire, appropriately so called from the number of caves in the rocks on the seashore there. These lands are said to have been part of the estate of MacDuff, the famous mormaor, or, as Shakespeare styles him, ' Thane ' of Fife, in the reign of Malcolm Canmore. Gillimichael, the third in descent from MacDuff, gave to his second son, Hugo, with other lands, the lands...
Page 172 - Accordingly, he entered the vault at the dead of night, seized the president, muffled him once more into the cloak, without speaking• a single word ; and using the same mode of transportation, conveyed him to Leith sands, and set down the astonished judge on the very spot where he had taken him up. The joy of his friends, and the less agreeable surprise of his successor, may be easily conceived, when the president appeared in court to reclaim his office and honours.
Page 172 - Meanwhile, the poor president spent a heavy time in the vault of the castle. He was imprisoned, and solitary ; receiving his food through an aperture in the wall, and never hearing the sound of a human voice, save when a shepherd called his dog, by the name of Batty, and when a female domestic called upon Maudge, the cat. These, he concluded, were invocations of spirits ; for he held himself to be in the dungeon of a sorcerer.

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