England in 1835: A Series of Letters Written to Friends in Germany During a Residence in London and Excursions Into the Provinces, Volume 2

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Page 289 - IN Kohln, a town of monks and bones, And pavements fang'd with murderous stones, And rags, and hags, and hideous wenches ; I counted two and seventy stenches, All well defined, and several stinks ! Ye Nymphs that reign o'er sewers and sinks, The river Rhine, it is well known, Doth wash your city of Cologne ; But tell me, Nymphs ! what power divine Shall henceforth wash the river Rhine...
Page 97 - ... in 1835, acknowledged Windsor to have made a greater impression on him than all the other castles he had ever seen put together. This is high praise from a native of Germany, where feudalism has left so many stately monuments of its frowning glory. " Windsor," says the acute critic, " combines the originality of the middle ages with the highest pitch of splendour and comfort which our times can reach. It is not an empty, tedious, monotonous repetition of the same sort of rooms over and over again...
Page 252 - Many objections might be made to the arrangement and proportions of the exterior, though its extent, and the colonnade, give it a certain air of grandeur. " But what shall I say of the interior ? I never saw anything that might be pronounced a more total failure in every respect. It is said, indeed, that, spite of the immense sums which have been expended, the king is so ill-satisfied with the result, that he has no mind to take up his residence in it when the unhappy edifice shall be finished. This...
Page 252 - It is said, indeed, that, spite of the immense sums which have been expended, the king is so ill-satisfied with the result, that he has no mind to take up his residence in it when the unhappy edifice shall be finished. This reluctance appears to me very natural. For my own part, I would not live in it rent-free; I should vex myself all the day long with the fantastic mixture of every style of architecture and decoration — the absence of all pure taste — the total want of feeling of measure and...
Page 16 - The lower classes, who often have to toil wearily through every other day, find Sunday (as it is constantly described) the weariest of all. Often, after serving an austere master, they are made to see in the Father of Love an austerer still. Singing, music, dancing, the drama, and all amusements which are addressed to our intellectual nature, are forbidden and denounced as schools of the devil. What is the consequence ? That people of temperate, regular habits conduct themselves in a temperate and...
Page 256 - ... subject of lamentation. Instead of wasting their time in fruitless abuse, people would then discover means of redressing real evils, of showing the groundlessness of false complaints, and of exhibiting absurdities in all their nakedness. If there be any individuals who think to turn the democratic heritage of these men to account, they will probably find themselves mistaken. The spirit of resistance to power, which grows with rank luxuriance on the rough, uncultured soil of the people, has a...
Page 253 - The spaces unskilfully divided, cut up, insulated ; the doors sometimes in the centre, sometimes in the corner — nay, in one room, there are three doors of different height and breadth ; over the doors, in some apartments, bas-reliefs and sculptures, in which pygmies and Brobdignagians are huddled together — people from two to six feet high living in admirable harmony. The smaller figures have such miserable spider legs and arms, that one would fancy they had been starved in a time of scarcity,...
Page 97 - Always the sharp outline of reality; the mathematics of life ; the arts of calculating, of gaining, of governing. In Windsor, on the contrary, England's history, so rich in interest, with all its recollections, suddenly stands before my eyes. These gigantic towers, bastions, balconies, chapels, churches, and knightly halls, in fresh and boundless variety; at every step new views over rivers, valleys, woods, and fields ; the fancies of a thousand years crowded together into one instant, and far supassing...
Page 53 - ... present a most agreeable spectacle to every eye and mind, that can be gratified by seeing and reflecting on the advantages derived to trade and social intercourse by this magnificent establishment." " Such a splendid display of carriages and four as these mail coaches," says Von Raumer, in 1835, " could not be found or got together in all Berlin.

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