Dramatic table talk, or Scenes, situations & adventures, serious & comic, in theatrical history & biography [signed R. Ryan].

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John Knight & Henry Lacey, 1825 - Actors - 893 pages
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Page 119 - I shall say the less of Mr. Collier, because in many things he has taxed me justly; and I have pleaded guilty to all thoughts and expressions of mine which can be truly argued of obscenity, profaneness, or immorality, and retract them. If he be my enemy, let him triumph; if he be my friend, as I have given him no personal occasion to be otherwise, he will be glad of my repentance.
Page 92 - I have neither wit, nor words, nor worth, Action, nor utterance, nor the power of speech, To stir men's blood: I only speak right on; I tell you that which you yourselves do know; Show you sweet Caesar's wounds, poor poor dumb mouths, And bid them speak for me: but were I Brutus, And Brutus Antony, there were an Antony Would ruffle up your spirits and put a tongue In every wound of Caesar that should move The stones of Rome to rise and mutiny.
Page 174 - WHEN Learning's triumph o'er her barb'rous foes First rear'd the stage, immortal Shakspeare rose ; Each change of many-colour'd life he drew, Exhausted worlds, and then imagin'd new: Existence saw him spurn her bounded reign, And panting Time toil'd after him in vain.
Page 174 - Then Jonson came, instructed from the school, To please in method, and invent by rule...
Page 177 - Ah ! let not Censure term our fate our choice, The stage but echoes back the public voice ; The drama's laws, the drama's patrons give, For we that live to please, must please to live. Then prompt no more the follies you decry, As tyrants doom their tools of guilt to die ; 'Tis yours, this night, to bid the reign commence Of rescued Nature and reviving Sense ; To chase the charms of sound, the pomp of show, For useful mirth and salutary woe ; Bid scenic Virtue form the rising age, And Truth diffuse...
Page 175 - The wits of Charles found easier ways to fame, Nor wish'd for Jonson's art, or Shakespeare's flame; Themselves they studied; as they felt, they writ; intrigue was plot, obscenity was wit.
Page 26 - ... public sports do not well agree with public calamities, nor public stage-plays with the seasons of humiliation, this being an exercise of sad and pious solemnity, and the other being spectacles of pleasure, too commonly expressing lascivious mirth and levity...
Page 8 - Because you are a Methodist preacher, and when you know who I am, you'll send me to the devil ! ' " ' The Lord forbid ! I am, as you say, a preacher of the Gospel of Jesus Christ, who tells us to clothe the naked, feed the hungry, and relieve the distressed ; and do you think I can behold a sister...
Page 165 - And there was many an hour Of blended kindred fame, When Siddons's auxiliar power And sister magic came. Together at the Muse's side...
Page 170 - Council of the city; and that is called the Mayor's play, where every one that will comes in without money, the Mayor giving the players a reward as he thinks fit to show respect unto them.

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