The System in Black and White: Exploring the Connections Between Race, Crime, and Justice

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Michael W. Markowitz, Delores D. Jones-Brown
Greenwood Publishing Group, 2001 - Law - 294 pages
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In a collection of compelling contributions to the study of the nexus between race, crime, and justice, noted scholars in the field critique many long-held assumptions and myths about race, challenging criminal justice policymakers to develop new and effective strategies for dealing with the social problems such misunderstandings create. In sections devoted to criminological theory, law enforcement, courts and the law, juvenile delinquency, and gender, contributors endeavor to dispel myths about African-American involvement in the criminal justice system. In so doing, a number of important facts are established about the race/crime nexus. For example, in an analysis of criminological theory, it is concluded that race, as a singular social factor, has not been adequately represented in existing paradigms. The subject of police profiling of African-Americans reveals an evolution of court decisions that have marginalized, rather than liberated, African-Americans since slavery. Each contributor challenges both the reader and the criminal justice system to develop meaningful strategies for addressing the racism that still pervades our system of justice.

A chapter on women of color in prison makes a compelling argument that such institutions often represent safer environments than the life on the streets women leave behind. This persuasive volume will be of interest to undergraduate and graduate students as well as faculty in Sociology, Criminal Justice, policy development, African-American and Women's Studies.

 

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Contents

Theoretical Explanations of the Nexus between Race and Crime
3
The Alchemy of Race and Crime Research
15
Deconstructing the Association of Race and Crime The Salience of Skin Color
31
The Empirical Status of the BlackSubcultureofViolence Thesis
47
Policing Race and Justice
63
Determinants of BlacktoWhite Arrest Differentials A Review of the Literature
65
Understanding the Connections between Race and Police Violence
73
The KingDenney Tapes Their Analysis and Implications for Police Use of Force Training
85
The Impact of Racial Demography on Jury Verdicts in Routine Adjudication
153
Race and Ethnic Bias in Sentencing Decisions A Review and Critique of the Literature
171
Media Images and the Victimization of Black Women Exploring the Impact of Sexual Stereotyping on Prosecutorial Decision Making
181
Racial Dimensions of Punishment and Delinquency
197
The Significance of Race in the Use of Restitution
199
Diversity in a Jail Work Setting Evaluating the Impact of Racial Intolerance
213
Overrepresentation of Minority Youth in the Juvenile Justice System Discrimination or Disproportionality of Delinquent Acts?
227
Substance Abuse and Race in a Delinquent Population
241

The SelfFulfilling Prophecy of Police Profiles
93
Conceptual Incarceration A ThirteenthAmendment Look at African Americans and Policing
109
Black and White Perceptions of the Appropriateness of Police Conduct
125
Race Courts and the Law
135
Race as a Legal Construct The Implications for American Justice
137
Prisons as Safe Havens for AfricanAmerican Women
267
INDEX
275
ABOUT THE EDITORS AND CONTRIBUTORS
291
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About the author (2001)

MICHAEL W. MARKOWITZ is Associate Professor and Coordinator of Criminal Justice at Widener University in Chester, Pennsylvania.

DELORES D. JONES-BROWN is on the faculty of John Jay College of Criminal Justice.

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