The Tin Trumpet, Or Heads and Tales, for the Wise and Waggish: To which are Added, Poetical Selections, Volume 1

Front Cover
Whittaker & Company, 1836 - Aphorisms and apothegms - 295 pages

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 67 - I knew a very wise man so much of Sir Chr — 's sentiment, that he believed if a man were permitted to make all the ballads, he need not care who should make the laws of a nation.
Page 240 - Thus may we gather honey from the weed, And make a moral of the devil himself.
Page 224 - If thine enemy be hungry, give him bread to eat; and if he be thirsty, give him water to drink: for thou shalt heap coals of fire upon his head, and the Lord shall reward thee.
Page 70 - Why no, Sir. Every body knows you are paid for affecting warmth for your client; and it is, therefore, properly no dissimulation: the moment you come from the bar you resume your usual behaviour. Sir, a man will no more carry the artifice of the bar into the common intercourse of society, than a man who is paid for tumbling upon his hands will continue to tumble upon his hands when he should walk on his feet.
Page 277 - I would only ask, why the civil state should be purged and restored by good and wholesome laws, made every third or fourth year in parliament assembled ; devising remedies as fast as time breedeth mischief: and contrariwise the ecclesiastical state should still continue upon the dregs of time, and receive no alteration now for these...
Page 209 - Go — you may call it madness, folly ; You shall not chase my gloom away. There's such a charm in melancholy, I would not, if I could, be gay. Oh, if you knew the pensive pleasure That fills my bosom when I sigh, You would not rob me of a treasure Monarchs are too poor to buy ! S.
Page 191 - There is surely a piece of divinity in us ; something that was before the elements, and owes no homage unto the sun. Nature tells me, I am the image of God as well as Scripture. He that understands not thus much hath not his introduction or first lesson, and is yet to begin the alphabet of man.
Page 240 - The web of our life is of a mingled yarn, good and ill together : our virtues would be proud if our faults whipped them not; and our crimes would despair if they were not cherished by our virtues.
Page 190 - The world that I regard is myself; it is the microcosm of my own frame that I cast mine eye on; for the other, I use it but like my globe, and turn it round sometimes for my recreation.
Page 114 - Every other idea, and every other end, that have been mixed with this, as the making of the church an engine, or even an ally, of the state ; converting it into the means of strengthening or...

Bibliographic information