The bagman's bioscope

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Edward Barrett, 1824 - 365 pages
 

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Page 328 - In saffron robe, with taper clear, And pomp, and feast, and revelry, With mask, and antique pageantry; Such sights as youthful poets dream On summer eves by haunted stream.
Page 277 - He made an administration, so checkered and speckled ; he put together a piece of joinery, so crossly indented and whimsically dove-tailed; a cabinet so variously inlaid; such a piece of diversified Mosaic ; such a tesselated pavement without cement ; here a bit of black stone, and there a bit of white...
Page 201 - For though there be no appearance of any stir, yet, I say, they will receive a terrible blow this Parliament, and yet they shall not see who hurts them.
Page 296 - And the king was much moved, and went up to the chamber over the gate, and wept : and as he went, thus he said, O my son Absalom, my son, my son...
Page 279 - The wretch who, after having seen the consequences of a thousand errors, continues still to blunder, and whose age has only added obstinacy to stupidity, is surely the object of either abhorrence or contempt, and deserves not that his gray hairs should secure him from insult.
Page 278 - When I see kings lying by those who deposed them, when I consider rival wits placed side by side, or the holy men that divided the world with their contests and disputes, I reflect with sorrow and astonishment on the little competitions, factions, and debates of mankind.
Page 121 - Whereas his Majesty is informed that the practice of reading Sermons is generally taken up by the preachers before the University, and therefore continues even before himself: " His Majesty hath commanded me to signify to you his pleasure, that the said practice, which took its beginning from the disorders of the late times, be wholly laid aside; and that the said preachers deliver their Sermons, both in Latin and English, by memory...
Page 281 - Then you discover the brightness of his mind and the strength of his judgment, accompanied with the most graceful mirth. In a word, by this enlivening aid, he is whatever is polite, instructive, and diverting. What makes him still more agreeable is, that he tells a story, serious or comical, with as much delicacy of humour as Cervantes himself.
Page 192 - Jennings, that several of his friends advised him to plead guilty, and throw himself on the mercy of the court.
Page 333 - My wits begin to turn. — Come on, my boy : how dost, my boy ? Art cold ? I am cold myself.— Where is this straw, my fellow ? The art of our necessities is strange, That can make vile things precious.

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