Critical and ethical

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Summer Quillinan dc 3034
304
French Revolution 1830 3089
308
Rotten Boroughs Ac 30910
309
Edgeworth Ac 31114
314
Sir Walter Scott
316
Of writing moro Prose 31618
318
Of the Reform Bill 3201
320
Of political Affairs 821
321
Family Affliction Ac
322
Lucretia Davidson Ac 3256
325
Tuition at the University 3267
326
Dissenters in University
327
Skelton
328
On a Tour
369
Letters to Brother
370
Emerson and Carlyle
371
Old Haunts revisited
372
AlstonsPortraitof ColcriJgo
373
The Laureateship 37780
377
Landor Ac 3801
381
Socinianism 3823
382
Sacred Hymns
383
Birthday in America Ac 8846
384
Classfellows and School fellows 3867
386
Queen Ac 3878
389
Poems of Imagination Ac 3913
391
Of the College of May nooth Ac 3934
393
Of the Hercsiarch Church of Rome 3945
394
Family Trials 3956
395
Mormonites Ac 3967
396
and 149 Death of Dora 39S9
398
To John Peace Esq 399400
399
A Senants Illness and Death
400
On the Death of Coleridge Further Reminiscences and Memo rabilia by Rev R P Graves An Americans Reminiscences Recollections of Aubrey do Yc...
403
Klop stock
405
Personal Reminiscences of
414
Hon Mr Justice Coleridge
423
430
430
Recollections of a Tour in Italy by II C Robinson
433
Reminiscoi ces of Lady Richard son and Mrs Davy
435
Conversations and Reminiscences recorded by the Bishop of Lincoln
458
Reminiscences of the Rev R P Graves 167
467
From Recollections of tho Last Days of Shelley and Byron by E J Trelawny Esq From Letters of Professor Taylor Anecdote of Crabbo
499
Later Opinion of Lord Brougham
504
232
513

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 475 - Around me I behold, Where'er these casual eyes are cast, The mighty minds of old : My never-failing friends are they, With whom I converse day by day. With them I take delight in weal And seek relief in woe ; And while I understand and feel How much to them I owe, My cheeks have often been bedew'd With tears of thoughtful gratitude.
Page 5 - Hawkshead and Ambleside, and gave me extreme pleasure. The moment was important in my poetical history ; for I date from it my consciousness of the infinite variety of natural appearances which had been unnoticed by the poets of any age or country, so far as I was acquainted with them ; and I made a resolution to supply, in some degree, the deficiency.
Page 390 - I saw Tennyson, when I was in London, several times. He is decidedly the first of our living poets, and I hope will live to give the world still better things. You will be pleased to hear that he expressed in the strongest terms his gratitude to my writings. To this I was far from indifferent, though persuaded that he is not much in sympathy with what I should myself most value in my attempts, viz., the spirituality with which I have endeavoured to invest the material universe, and the moral relations...
Page 17 - you represent him as having killed one of these birds on entering the South Sea, and that the tutelary spirits of these regions take upon them to avenge the crime.
Page 134 - ... present, as one should lightly see; and whereas in his clothes he appeared a withered and crooked silly old man, he now stood bolt upright, as comely a father as one might lightly behold.
Page 215 - Of troublous and distressed mortality, That thus make way unto the ugly Birth Of their own Sorrows, and do still beget Affliction, upon Imbecility : Yet seeing thus the course of things must run, He looks thereon not strange, but as fore-done. And whilst distraught Ambition compasses, And is encompassed, while as Craft deceives, And is deceived : whilst Man doth ransack Man, And builds on blood, and rises by distress ; And th...
Page 474 - MY days among the Dead are past ; Around me I behold, Where'er these casual eyes are cast, The mighty minds of old: My never-failing friends are they, With whom I converse day by day.
Page 273 - Be strong ; — be worthy of the grace Of God, and fill thy destined place : A soul, by force of sorrows high, Uplifted to the purest sky Of undisturbed humanity...
Page 43 - And they that shall be of thee shall build the old waste places; thou shall raise up the foundations of many generations, and thou shalt be called the repairer of the breach, the restorer of paths to dwell in...
Page 319 - Again and again I must repeat, that the composition of verse is infinitely more of an art than men are prepared to believe ; and absolute success in it depends upon innumerable minutiae, which it grieves me you should stoop to acquire a knowledge of. Milton talks of ' pouring easy his unpremeditated verse...