Lady Anna

Front Cover
Oxford University Press, 1998 - Fiction - 517 pages
When it appeared in 1874, Lady Anna met with little success, and positively outraged the conservative - This is the sort of thing the reading public will never stand...a man must be embittered by some violent present exasperation who can like such disruptions of social order as this.' ( Saturday Review ) - although Trollope himself considered it the best novel I ever wrote! Very much! Quite far away above all others!!!' This tightly constructed and passionate study of enforced marriage in the world of Radical politics and social inequality, records the lifelong attempt of Countess Lovel to justify her claim to her title, and her daughter Anna's legitimacy, after her husband announces that he already has a wife. However, mother and daughter are driven apart when Anna defies her mother's wish that she marry her cousin, heir to her father's title, and falls in love with journeyman tailor and young Radical Daniel Thwaite. The outcome is never in doubt, but Trollope's ambivalence on the question is profound, and the novel both intense and powerful.

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Contents

CHAPTER II
12
CHAPTER III
23
CHAPTER IV
31
CHAPTER V
42
CHAPTER VI
57
CHAPTER VII
63
CHAPTER VIII
72
CHAPTER IX
84
Bedford Square
239
CHAPTER XXIV
249
CHAPTER XXVI
266
CHAPTER XXVIII
286
CHAPTER XXX
312
CHAPTER XXXII
332
CHAPTER XXXIV
356
CHAPTER XXXVI
376

CHAPTER X
93
Have they Surrendered
116
New Friends
127
CHAPTER XIV
140
CHAPTER XV
151
CHAPTER XVI
160
The Journey Home
170
CHAPTER XVIII
182
Lady Anna returns to London
193
CHAPTER XX
204
CHAPTER XXI
215
CHAPTER XXII
226
LADY ANNA
411
CHAPTER XL
419
Nearer and Nearer
430
CHAPTER XLII
441
CHAPTER XLIII
452
CHAPTER XLIV
462
CHAPTER XLV
473
CHAPTER XLVI
487
CHAPTER XLVII
497
Explanatory Noles
514
Copyright

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About the author (1998)

Stephen Orgel is Jackson Eli Reynolds Professor of English at Stanford University. He has edited The Tempest for The Oxford Shakespeare, and the forthcoming Oxford Authors Milton.

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