The wanderings of Persiles and Sigismunda [tr. by L.D. Stanley].

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 467 - ... when it is perfectly formed, the shell gapeth open, and the first thing that appeareth is the aforesaid lace or string ; next come the legs of the bird hanging out; and as it groweth greater, it openeth the shell by degrees, till at length it is all come forth and hangeth only by the bill. In short space after, it cometh to full maturatie, and falleth into the sea, where it gathereth feathers and groweth to a fowl bigger than a mallard and lesser than a goose...
Page 467 - When it is perfectly formed, the shell gapeth open, and the first thing that appeareth is the foresaid lace or string ; next come the legs of the bird hanging out, and as it groweth greater, it openeth the shell by degrees, till at length it is all come forth, and hangeth only by the bill. In short space after it cometh to full maturity, and falleth into the sea...
Page 467 - ... in shape like those of the muskle, but sharper pointed, and of a whitish colour...
Page 472 - Yet some men say in many parts of England that King Arthur is not dead, but had by the will of our Lord Jesu into another place; and men say that he shall come again, and he shall win the holy cross. I will not say it shall be so, but rather I will say, here in this world he changed his life. But many men say that there is written upon his tomb this verse: Hie jacet Arthurus Rex, quondam Rex que futurus.
Page 467 - ... to the shape and form of a bird : when it is perfectly formed, the shell gapeth open and the first thing that appeareth is the...
Page 471 - Arthur, but with some variations, especially in the concluding stanzas ; in which the author seems rather to follow the traditions of the old Welsh Bards, who ' believed that King Arthur was not dead, but conveied awaie by the Fairies into some pleasant place, where he should remaine for a time, and then returne againe and reign in as great authority as ever.
Page 468 - Lancashire call by no other name than a tree-goose ; which place aforesaid, and all those parts adjoining, " do so much abound therewith, that one of the best is bought for three-pence. For the truth hereof, if any doubt, may it please them to repaire unto me, and I shall satisfie them by the testimonie of good witnesses.
Page 467 - But what our eyes have seen and our hands have touched" continues 'the Author, doubtless with full sincerity, " we shall declare. There is a small island in Lancashire called the Pile of Foulders, wherein are found the broken pieces of old and bruised ships, some whereof have been cast thither by...
Page 468 - Goose, hauing blacke legs and bill or beake, and feathers blacke and white, spotted in such manner as is our Magpie, called in some places a Pie-Annet, which the people of Lancashire call by no other name than a tree Goose : which place aforesaid, and all those parts adjoyning do so much abound therewith, that one of the best is bought for three pence.
Page 471 - ... thereby : then he swimmeth over the said lake to the other side ; and being entered into the wildernesse, is presently transfigured and turned into a wolfe, and so keepeth company with his like of that kind for nine yeeres space ; during which time (if he forbeare all the while to eat...

Bibliographic information