A Summary View of the Statistics and Existing Commerce of the Principal Shores of the Pacific Ocean: With a Sketch of the Advantages, Political and Commercial, which Would Result from the Establishment of a Central Free Port Within Its Limits; and Also of One in the Southern Atlantic

Front Cover
J.M. Richardson, 1818 - Atlantic Ocean - 365 pages
0 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 328 - They should have begun their work by teaching some of those useful arts which are the inlets of knowledge, and lead the mind by degrees to objects of higher comprehension. Agriculture, so formed to fix and combine society, and so preparatory to objects of superior consideration, should have been the first thing introduced among a savage people: it attaches the wandering tribe to that spot where it...
Page 327 - ... they spared no labour, and avoided no danger, in the execution of their important office; and it is to be seriously lamented that their pious endeavours did not meet with the success which they deserved ; for there is hardly a trace to be found, beyond the cultivated parts, of their meritorious functions. " The cause of this failure must be attributed to a want of due consideration in the mode employed by the missionaries to propagate the religion of which they were the zealous ministers.
Page 208 - But they are covered to the very summits with trees and shrubs, in such a manner, that the spectator can scarcely help thinking that the very rocks possess the property of producing and supporting their verdant clothing. The flat land which bounds those...
Page 327 - ... if sufferings and hardships in the prosecution of the great work which they had undertaken deserved applause and admiration, they had an undoubted claim to be admired and applauded : they spared no labour and avoided no danger in the execution of their important office, and it is to be seriously lamented that their pious endeavours did not meet with the success which they deserved ; for there is hardly a trace to be found beyond the cultivated...
Page 327 - ... functions, The cause of this failure must be attributed to a want of due consideration in the mode employed by the missionaries, to propagate the religion of which they were the zealous ministers. They habituated themselves to the savage life, and naturalized themselves to the savage manners, and, by thus becoming dependent, as it were, on the natives, they acquired their contempt rather than their veneration.
Page 209 - ... trees and shrubs, in such a manner, that the spectator can scarcely help thinking, that the very rocks possess the property of producing and supporting their verdant, clothing. The flat land which bounds those hills...
Page 329 - ... and admired. They spared no labour and avoided no danger in the discharge of their important office ; but it is to be deeply lamented that their pious endeavours did not meet with the success they deserved, for there is hardly a trace to be found of them beyond the cultivated parts of the country. " The whole of their long route I have often travelled ; and the recollection of such a people as the missionaries having been there was confined to a few superannuated Canadians, who had not left that...
Page 327 - ... and hardships in the prosecution of the great work which they had undertaken* deserved applause and admiration, they had an undoubted claim to be admired and applauded: they spared no labour and avoided no danger in the execution of their important office; and it is to be seriously lamented, that their pious endeavours did not meet with the success which they deserved: for there is hardly a trace to be found beyond the cultivated parts, of their meritorious functions.
Page 254 - If you think proper, you may burn them all in the fire ; or, if you like, send them to your country, for the inspection of the people of Europe, that they may satisfy their curiosity, and know Tahiti's foolish gods...
Page 328 - ... the mind by degrees to objects of higher comprehension. Agriculture, so formed to fix and combine society, and so preparatory to objects of superior consideration, should have been the first thing introduced among a savage people ; it attaches the .wandering tribe to that spot where it adds so much to their comforts, while it gives them a sense of property and of lasting possession, instead of the uncertain hopes of the chace, and the fugitive produce of uncultivated wilds.

Bibliographic information