Elegiac Sonnets: And Other Poems

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Page 117 - It is worthy the observing, that there is no passion in the mind of man so weak, but it mates ' and masters the fear of death; and therefore death is no such terrible enemy when a man hath so many attendants about him that can win the combat of him. Revenge triumphs over death ; Love slights it; Honour aspireth to it; Grief flieth to it; Fear pre-occupateth it...
Page 72 - Shall yield their fairy-charms to mournful Truth; Even now, a mother's fond prophetic fear Sees the dark train of human ills appear; Views various fortune for each lovely child, Storms for the bold, and...
Page 117 - D'erbe novelle e di novelli amori; Tu torni ben, ma teco Non tornano i sereni E fortunati dì delle mie gioie: Tu torni ben, tu torni; Ma teco altro non torna, Che del perduto mio caro tesoro La rimembranza misera e dolente. Tu quella se', tu quella Ch'eri pur dianzi sì vezzosa e bella; Ma non son io già quel ch' un tempo fui Sì caro agli occhi altrui.
Page 68 - Ceres' shrine ; For dull to humid eyes appear The golden glories of the year ; Alas ! a melancholy worship's mine ! I hail the goddess for her scarlet flower. Thou brilliant weed That dost so far exceed The richest gifts gay Flora can bestow, Heedless I pass'd thee in Life's morning hour (Thou comforter of woe), Till Sorrow taught me to confess thy power.
Page 27 - Tho' o'er his coffin with the humid earth No children drop the unavailing tear? Rather rejoice that here his sorrows cease, Whom sickness, age, and poverty oppress'd; Where Death, the Leveller, restores to peace The wretch who living knew not where to rest. Rejoice, that tho
Page 71 - By thee, the hopeless die! Oh ! ever ' friendly to despair,' Might Sorrow's pallid votary dare (Without a crime) that remedy implore, Which bids the spirit from its bondage fly, I'd court thy palliative aid no more! No more I'd sue, that thou shouldst...
Page 32 - O'er the dim grey horizon now faintly appears ; She flies to the quay, dreading tidings of ruin, All breathlefs with hafte, half expiring with fears. Poor mourner ! — I would that my fortune had left me The means to alleviate the woes I deplore...
Page 96 - ... ler upon the Thames. It is fcarcely credible to what " height they will mount ; which is yet precifely true, " and a thing eafily to be obferved by one that fhall " fix his eye fome time on any part of the heavens, " the white web, at a vaft diftance, very diftinftly " appearing from the azure fky — But this is in Au" tumn only, and that in very fair and calm weather.
Page 30 - She ftarts at the billows that burft at her feet. There, day after day, with an anxious heart heaving, She watches the waves where they mingle with air ; For the fail which, alas ! all her fond hopes deceiving, May bring only tidings to add to her care. Loofe ftream to wild winds thofe fair flowing...
Page 18 - Of denser clouds shall hide thee, the pursuit Of the keen swift may end thy fairy sail. Thus on the golden thread that fancy weaves Buoyant, as Hope's illusive flattery breathes, The young and visionary poet leaves Life's dull realities, while seven-fold wreathes Of rainbow light around his head revolve.

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