English Local Prisons, 1860-1900: Next Only to Death

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Routledge, Oct 24, 2018 - History - 834 pages
The local prisons of the latter half of the nineteenth century refined systems of punishment so harsh that one judge considered the maximum penalty of two years local imprisonment to be the most severe punishment known to English law: "next only to death". This work examines how private perceptions and concerns became public policy. It also traces the move in English government from the rural and aristocratic to the urban and more democratic. It follows the rise of the powerful elite of the higher civil service, describes some of the forces that attempted to oppose it, and provides a window through which to view the process of state formation.

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Contents

List of figures and tables Acknowledgements
Abbreviations
INTRODUCTION
THE SOCIAL AND PENAL IDEAS OF THE FOURTH EARL OF CARNARVON
A PROPHET IN HIS OWN COUNTY
CARNARVON AND NATIONAL PENAL POLICY
THE SOCIAL AND PENAL IDEAS OF SIR EDMUND DU CANE
THE FLAWED PROSPECTUS
NEW TASKS Identification and executions
THE JUSTICES REACT TO NATIONALIZATION Individual committees
THE COMMITTEES ATTEMPT TO ORGANIZE
TRIUMPH OF THE CLERKS
THE CALL FOR A PRISON INQUIRY
PERSONALITIES AND PREOCCUPATIONS
COMPOUNDING ERRORS
AFTERMATH

ENFORCING UNIFORMITY Discipline labour and instruction 7 ENFORCING UNIFORMITY Health dietary and discharge arrangements 8 ENFOR...
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About the author (2018)

Faculty of Laws, Queen Mary and Westfield College, University of London.

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