The Dublin University Magazine, Volume 2

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William Curry, Jun., and Company, 1833
 

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Page 276 - Could I embody and unbosom now That which is most within me, — could I wreak My thoughts upon expression, and thus throw Soul, heart, mind, passions, feelings, strong or weak, All that I would have sought, and all I seek, Bear, know, feel, and yet breathe — into one word, And that one word were Lightning, I would speak; But as it is, I live and die unheard, AVith a most voiceless thought, sheathing it as a sword.
Page 161 - What soul was his, when, from the naked top Of some bold headland, he beheld the sun Rise up, and bathe the world in light...
Page 159 - Earth has not anything to show more fair: Dull would he be of soul who could pass by A sight so touching in its majesty: This City now doth, like a garment, wear The beauty of the morning; silent, bare, Ships, towers, domes, theatres, and temples lie Open unto the fields, and to the sky; All bright and glittering in the smokeless air. Never did sun more beautifully steep In his first splendour, valley, rock, or hill...
Page 158 - Heavens! what a goodly prospect spreads around, Of hills, and dales, and woods, and lawns, and spires, And glittering towns, and gilded streams, till all The stretching landscape into smoke decays!
Page 501 - And said unto the woman, Now we believe, not because of thy saying : for we have heard him ourselves, and know that this is indeed the Christ, the Saviour of the world.
Page 171 - GEOLOGY is the science which investigates the successive changes that have taken place in the organic and inorganic kingdoms of nature ; it enquires into the causes of these changes, and the influence which they have exerted in modifying the surface and external structure of our planet.
Page 467 - There is in human nature generally more of the fool than of the wise; and therefore those faculties by which the foolish part of men's minds is taken are most potent.
Page 160 - Are good manure for their more bare biography, Wordsworth's last quarto, by the way, is bigger Than any since the birthday of typography; A drowsy frowzy poem, called the 'Excursion,' Writ in a manner which is my aversion.
Page 277 - Philomel ! Enough, enough, the rustling trees Announce a shower upon the breeze, — The flashes of the summer sky Assume a deeper, ruddier dye : Yon lamp that trembles on the stream, From forth our cabin sheds its beam ; And we must early sleep, to find Betimes the morning's healthy wind.

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