'What Do You Care What Other People Think?': Further Adventures of a Curious Character

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Penguin Adult, Sep 6, 2007 - Science - 256 pages
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Richard Feynman Nobel Laureate, teacher, icon and genius possessed an unquenchable thirst for adventure and an unparalleled gift for telling the extraordinary stories of his life.

In this collection of short pieces and reminiscences he describes everything from his love of beauty to college pranks to how his father taught him to think. He takes us behind the scenes of the space shuttle Challenger investigation, where he dramatically revealed the cause of the disaster with a simple experiment. And he tells us of how he met his beloved first wife Arlene, and their brief time together before her death. Sometimes intensely moving, sometimes funny, these writings are infused with Feynman s curiosity and passion for life.

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Excellent Book

User Review  - LibraryManager2013 - Tesco

'What do you care what other people think' an excellent title for an interesting book about the life of a curious character, who was always inquisitive and took pleasure from finding things out. Read full review

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About the author (2007)

Richard P Feynman was one of this century's most brilliant theo­retical physicists and original thinkers. Born in Far Rockaway, New York, in 1918 he studied at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he graduated with a BS in 1939. He went on to Princeton and received his Ph.D. in 1942 During the war years he worked at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. He became Professor of Theoretical Physics at Cornell University, where he worked with Hans Bethe. He all but rebuilt the theory of quantum electrodynamics and high-energy physics and it was for this work that he shared the Nobel Prize in 1965. Feynman was a visiting professor at the California Institute of Technology in 1950, where he later accepted a permanent faculty appointment, and became Richard Chace Tolman Professor of Theo­retical Physics in 1959. He had an extraordinary ability to communicate his science to audiences at all levels, and was a well­-known and popular lecturer. Richard Feynman died in 1988 after a long illness. Freeman Dyson of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey, called him `the most original mind of his generation', while in its obiturary The New York Timesdescribed him as `arguably the most brilliant, iconoclastic and influential of the postwar generation of theoretical physicists'.

A number of collections and adaptations of his

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