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Line 40. Her fate is on tbe wing, is Line 62 : an expression highly poetical and im “ Thy lyre, thy locks, thy person, specious pressive, but there is nothing like it in gifts ine original. We cannot refit the plea Of partial Venus, will avail thee nought." fure of transcribing what we think a See Horace, lib. I. 15: most happy and beautiful version :

“Nequicquam Veneris præsidio ferox Lines 67, &c.

Pectes cæsariem, grataque foeminis * My fellow-warriors hcar: a dream from Imbelli citlara carmina divides" heaven,

Line 260: Amid the ftillaess of the vacant night,

“ He would his downcast eyes Approached me; semblance close in stature,

So rivet on the earth bulk, And air of noble Nestor. At mine head

Ovid, in his XIIIth book, describes The shadow took his stand, and thus he Ulysses rising to speak in fimilar terms : (pake

“ Adftitit atque oculos paulum tellure Line 146. Strike truce will be ob

Sustulit ad proceresjected to by some readers, as harsh and inelegant. The phrase of Rriking hands,

Line 330. Agamemnon's invocation Ariking a bargain, is common, but cer

is very beautiful : tainly

vulgar. The ferire foedus of the “ Jove, father, who from Ida stretcheft forth Latins contained an obvious allufion to

Thine arm omnipotent, o'er-ruling all; the venerable ceremonies of sacrifice,

And thou all-fering and all-bearing Sun ; and was therefore, at the same time,

Ye Rivers, and thou conscious Earth, and ye

Who under earth on human kind avenge forcible and familiar. Its correspondent

Severe the guilt of violated oaths, term in English, to frike a bargain, be

Hear ye, and ratify what now we swear," ing imperfectly understood as to its ori:

&c. &c. gin, is applied on the coinmonelt ucca. All-seeing and all-hearing express, with fions, without dignity or force, and has been always rejected from grave and

beautiful propriety, ος σαντ' εφορας και fententious compositions.

wart' enaxBus. Malon uses a similar ad

junct, to all, with equal force, in a Lines 165 to 184 are truly admirable,

prayer

of Caratacus : in whatever point of view they are

My sonl confides considered.

In that all-healing and all-forming power Line 268. In piercing accents Aridu. Who in the radiant day when Time was born lous. Stridulous is perhaps not a bad Plunged his broad eye amidst the wilds of word, but it is of very rare occurrence,

Ocean, and never, we believe, to be found in And calmed it with a glance" our best writers. Besides, its proper Line 458. Twitcbed her fragrant robe. meaning is, making a small noise; and Erivati, ihook. thus it is properly explained in our Dico cionaries ; fo that, applied to piercing sendered by "Hero of the amber locks"

Line 511. Earlw Menihaw is happily accents, it involves a folecison. 'A little farther on, though from the mouth of -literally, yellow-haired.

The whole of the third book does the Therfites we object to the expression but tuff for be plent, so we do allo, in highest honour to the author of The the following page, to many a bloody Talk. The beautiful episodes which it wbelk. Both are vulgarisms.

contains presented a favourable object

for the exercise of his talents as a poet, Mr. Cowper is very successful in ren- of which he has most happily availed dering the fpeech of Agamemnon, lines himself. 443 to 472 ; nor is he less so in his ca

Book IV. line 4: talogue of the thips, by no means the of his labour.

“ Pledging each

His next Book 111. line 46. Curs Paris. The is too abrupt, and certainly inelegant. original is Avonap Unhappy Paris.

Line 190. This I know, know surely. The same epithet is applied by Euripi. The repetition is, in this place, without des to Helen. I would to all in beaven, force, and by no means equal to may be excepted to as an uncouth phraseology, and as not warranted by Ευ γαρ εξω τοδε οιδα καλα φρενα και

καλα θυμον the original.

Line

cafiett part

Line, 281. The rugged work of war. 189. Cbriftianity confifent wisb-Love of Rugged is a ftrong and pertinent epithet Freedom; being an Answer to Sem thus applied. The original is, “ shrink lately published by tbe Rev. John Clayton, "ing from offlialing war."

By Robert Hall, M. A. With Mr. Cowper's animated de THE preface, dated from Cambridge, scription of the two armies advancing to Sept. 17, ftates, that "these animado

“ verfions did not arise from any conengage we shall conclude our notice of the fourth book, and our observations ! viction of there being any thing even of this month:

“ of plausibility in Mr. Clayton's rea« As when the waves, by Zephyrus up a that certain accidental and occafia

heaved, Crowdfall toward some sounding shore, at first opal prejudices might give some On the broad bosom ofthe deep their heads “ degree of weight to one of the weak, Thiey cast on high, then breaking on the land “ eft defences of a bad cause that was 2 hunder, and o’er the rocks that breast the “ ever undertaken. I have taken up flood

“ more time in thewing that there is no Borne turgid, [catter far the Showery spray- proper connexion between the Unita, So moved the Greeks fucceffive, rank by rank, "rian doctrine and the principles of And phalanx after phalanx, every chicf

liberty.than the fubject may seem to His loud command proclaiming, while the rest,“ require; but this will not be thooght As voice in all those thousands none had been,

“ superfluous by those who recollect Heard mute, and, in resplendent armour clad,

" that thar idea' feems to be the great With martinl order terrible, advanced. Not so the Trojans came. As sheep, the flock

"' hinge of Mr. Clayton's discourse, and Of some rich man, by thousands in his court

" and that it appears, among the orthoPenned close at milking time, incessant bleat, “ dox part of the Diffenters, to have Loud answering all their bleating lambs with “ been productive, aiready, of unhappy out,

“ effects. I shall only add, that these Such din from Thurus'wide-fpread host arose. ” remarks would have appeared much Nor was their shout nor was their accent one, 4 sooner but for severe indisposition, But mingled languages were heard of men « and that I was induced to write them From various climes. These Mars to battle “ chiefly from a persuasion that they raised,

"might, perhaps, in the present in These Pallas azure-eyed : nor Terror thence

• Stance, have some additional weight, Nor Flight was absent, nor insatiate Strife,

as coming from one who is rot aa Sister and mate of homicidal Mars,

" Unitarian." -Mr. Clayton is repreWho, finall at first, but swist to grow, from earth

sented, p. ?, as a Diffentingminister, Her towering creft lifts gradual to the kies. coming forth to the publick under the She, foe alike to both, the brands dispersed

character of a flatterer of power, and Of buining hate between them, and the woes an accuser of bis bretbren: his favourite Enhanced of battle wherefoe'er the pass’d.” maxim of the inconsillency of Chriftia

of the above quotation may be said pity with political science as a ferrile what Johnson remarked of Gray's maxim; and his argument, that a Elegy: “It were vain to blame and Christian cannor lawfully incerfere in **uleless to praise it."

the adminiftration of government, drawn (To be continued.)

from our Saviour's Glence on ebat fub.

je&t, as a circumstance of itself sufficient 188. Paradise Reviewed: containing a Series to support a quite contrary conclufion.

of Ejays, in wbicb are deduced cur Duties After detailing the accustomed arguin Life from Man's Nature and Originalion; ments in favour of the Diffenting-miand in wbich is attempted to be described, ibe nifters counteracting the Dignitaries of universal Peqer of Beauty; wieb a pbilofo- the Hierarchy, and promoting improve. phical Ejay on Live

ments in civil government, he confesses OUR ideas of paradise being deduced his disapprobation of the religious tenets from the beautiful descriptions of that of Dr. Priestley, as erroneous in the ex. primæral state of our first parents which treme, but pays high compliments to his we have read many years ago, and still abilities. All is panegyrick on this continue to peruse with equal fatisfac- fide; all is invective on the other. The tion, in Milton's works, we hope the objections to the doctrine, from Scripwell-meaning writer of this shapsody cure, are by no means removed. • The will excuse our enlarging further than " zeal Unitarians have displayed in de: his own title gees.

“ fence of civil and religious liberty is

ence

" the spirit natural to a minority, who len Manufafture. In Two Parts Part I. “ are well aware they are viewed by the containing Seridures on Appendix, No 4, 10 « ecclefiaftical powers with an unparal. & Report made by a Committee of ebe Higbo “ leled malignity and rancour. Let the land Scciety on the Subje&t of Shetland Ifaolo “ Diflenters at large remember they too

Part II. containing a brief Hilory of Woch, “ are a minority, a great minority, and

and tbe Nature of sbe Woollen M nufacture “ that they must look for their security

as connealed wirb it. By a Wiltshire Clo

abier, F. A. S. 8vo. 46 from the fame quarter, not from the compliments of bithops, or presents

THIS Wiltshire Clothier and F.A.S. from maids of honour.

We know has united to twenty-five years experithe Dissenters are a minority; and we

on his subje&t no inconsiderable know too, from their explicit declara•

fock of reading. Both together bave rious, how much chey aspire to be a furnished him with a fund of useful obmajority.

Servations. He controverts those of Dr. We underland Mr. H. is the succes. Anderson on the manufacture of wool for of the late Mr. Robinson in bis in England, and contends that he was meeting near Cambridge.

milled by Rapin as to the price of that article in 1337.

Our author argues 190. A Cbarge by John Clayton; a Sermon against the exportation of it, that on by Benjamin Davies, D. D.; wirb an In- every 20 thillings worth sent abroad, troduttory Address, by Thomas Towie, B.D. there is above 60 Chillings worth of laAll delivered on Wednesday, July 29, 1791, bour taken from the community. Wheat ibe public Separation of tbe Rev. James ther the exportation of raw as well as Knight so tbc l'afforal Office in the Courcb of manufactured wool would, or would avbich sbe late Rey. John Rogers was not, be a public benefit to the kingdom, Palins.

remains fill undecided. Mr. Wanley WE have here the whole process of writes like a person well acquainted a Calvinistic ordination. The text of with his subject; and to his history of the sermon is Philip. ii. 1, 2. Mr. R. wool and the woollen manufacture, was pastor of a congregation in South

which Dr. A. appears to know little of, wark 45 years, and died, in his 74ch adds many valuable and useful fa&ts. year, Sept. 2, 1799.

Such a writer deserves the ritle of 191. A British Freebolder's Address. 10 bis ed in the Archæologia, where Mr. W.

F.A.S.; and if such essays were inferi. Countrymen on Thomas Paine's “ Rigbis of has already appeared, they would im. Man."

ARMED with becoming indignation, prove it: whereas Dr. A. is too misthe Britilh Frecholder centures and ex

cellaneous and hacknied a writer.--- Mr. poses the scurrility and absurdity of W. throws out fome judicious remarks Thomas Paine.

on the use of machines in the coulou and woollen manufactures.

In order to deterinide on the expe192. Plan submitted to be Publick by the Society

for ibe Improvement of British Wool. diency of exportation towards encouTHE directors have it now in their raging the growth of wool, three very power to communicate to the publick a material points are to be considered. more particular account of their plan of First, Is it probable that, by exportadirecting their attention to the particu- tion, a greater quantity of wool will be Jar breeds of theep, for the hilly parts, produced? Second, Will more employe the lowlands, the islands, and foreign

ment be found for our own labourers, countries. Among various experiments and of course morc benefit accrue to the on theep take the following, for cloathe publick, from the exportation of wool : ing them with common, vnbleached, or Third, Does the exportation of wool green line, done over with Lord Dun- tend at all to the advantage of our rivals donald's car; by which the bad effects in trade, and consequently injure our of wet, more prejudicial to them than

own manufacturers : The well.incold, will be prevenced. The covering formed and judicious writer of the work of each does not exceed 7d. and will, before us feems to have weighed these with proper attention, probably last two several particulars with mature delibe. or three years.

This plan is signed ration, and to have proved, incontciia. * John Sinclair, Chairman."

bly, that it will be more politic to pro

hibit than to allow the exportation of 193.1Vool encouraged without Exportation; or, wool as, a rauv material. To demon.

Practical Objer va:ims mifud and one li zelo krate his opinion, he observes, p. 26,

" The

60

more

Line 2$1. The rugged work of war. 189. Christianity consipene wirb.co Love of Rugged is a strong and pertinent epithet Freedom; being an Answer to a Sermont thus applied. The original is," hrink lately published by tbe Rev. John Clayton, “ing from offtialing war.”

By Robert Hall, M. A. With Mr. Cowper's animated de THE preface, dated from Cambridge, scription of the two armies advancing to Sept. 17, ftates, that these animado

6. verfions did not arise from any conengage sve shall conclude our notice of the fourth book, and our observations & viction of there being any thing even of this month :

“ of plausibility in Mr. Clayton's rea. « As when the waves, by Zephyrus upo u that certain accidenial and occasio

soning, but from an apprehension heaved, Crowdfast towardsome rounding shore, at first “ opal prejudices might give fomc On the broad bosom of the deep their heads “ degree of weight to one of the weak: They cast on high, then breaking on the land “ eft defences of a bad cause that was Thunder, and o'er the rocks that breast the “ ever undertaken. I have taken up flood

rirne in fhewing that there is no Borne turgid, scatter far the Lowery (pray

proper connexion between the Unita, So moved inc Greeks successive, rank by rank, «rian doctrine and the principles of And phalanx after phalanx, every chief His loud command proclaiming, while the rest, “require; but this will not be thought

“liberty.than the fubjcct may seem to As voice in all those thousands mone had been,

«« superfluous by those who recollect Heard niute, and, in resplendent armour clad,

" that that idea feems to be the great With martial order terrible, advanced. Notío the Trojans came. As sheep, the flock

(binge of Mr. Clayton's discourse, and Of some rich man, by thousands in his court

66 and that it appears, among the orthoPenned close at milking time, incellant bleat, “ dox part of the Diffencers, to have Loud answering all their bleating lambs with- “ been productive, already, of unhappy out,

“ effects. I fall only add, that thlle Such din from Thprus' wide-spread hoft arose.“ remarks would have appeared much Nor was their thout nor was their accent one, " sooner but for severe indisposition, But mingled languages were heard of men " and that I was induced to write them From various climes. These Mars to battle “ chiefly from a persuasion that they raised,

"might, perhaps, in the present in, These Pallas azure-eyed : nor Terror thence

“ Stance, have some additional weight, Nor Flight was abfent, nor insatiate Strife,

as coming from one who is not an Sister and mate of homicidal Mars, Who, fall at first, but swift to grow, from Unitarian.” -Mr. Clayton is repre. earth

sented, p. 2, as a Disfepting-minister, Her towering creft lifts gradual to the skies. coming forth to the publick under the She, foe alike to both, the brands dispersed

character of a flatterer of power, and Of burning hale between them, and the woes an accufer of bis bretbren: his favourite Enhanced of battle whereroe'er the pass’d." maxim of the inconfiilency of Chriftia.

of the above quotation may be said nity with political science as a Servile what Johnson remarked of Gray's maxim; and his argument, that a Elegy: "It were vain to blame and Chriftian cannot lawfully interfere in si useless to praise it."!

the adminiftration of government, drawn (To be continued.)

from our Saviour's Glence on that fub.

je&t, as a circumstance of itself sufficiens 138. Paradise Reviewed: containing a Series to fupport a quite contrary conclufion.

of Ellys, in wbicb are deduced cur Duties After detailing the accustomed arguin Life from Man's Nature and Originalion; ments in favour of the Dissenting-miord in wbich is attempred so be dejiribed ibe nisters counteracting the Dignitaries of universal Power of Beauty; wieb a pbilosoo the Hierarchy, and promoting improve. phical Ejay on Live

ments ia civil government, he confesses OUR ideas of paradise being deduced his disapprobation of the religious tenets from the beautiful descriptions of that of Dr. Priestley, as erroneous in the ex. primæral ftace of our first parents which treme, but pays high compliments to his we have read many years ago, and fill abilities. All is panegyrick on this continue to peruse with equal fatisfac- fide; all is in vective on the other. The tion, in Milton's works, we hope the objections to the doctrine, from Scripwell-meaning writer of this shapsody cure, are by no means removed. "The will excuse our enlarging further than zeal Unitarians have displayed in de: his own title goes.

“ fence of civil and religioas liberty is

A

"ibe fpirit natural to a minority, who len Manufallure. In Two Perise Part I. “ are well aware they are viewed by the containing Stridures on Appendix, No 4, 10 “ ecclefiaftical powers with an unparal. Report made by a Committee of the Higbo “ Jeled malignity and rancour. Let the

land Srciety on the Subje&t of Shetland I'wl. Diflenters at large remember they too

Part II. containing a brief History of Wool, « are a minority, a great minority, and

and ebe Nature of rbe Woollen Mnufacture " that they mun look for their security

as conneaed wirb is. By « Wiltshire Close

tbier, F. A, S. 8vo. 4" from the fame quarter, not from the " compliments of bishops, or presents

THIS Wiltshire Clothier and F.A.S. from maids of honour." We know

has united to cwenty-five years experithe Diflenters are a minority; and we

ence on his fubje&t no inconsiderable know too, from their explicit declara. fock of reading. Both together bave rions, how much chey aspire to be a

furnished him with a fund of useful obmajority.

fervations. He controverts those of Dr. We undergand Mr. H. is the succes. Anderson on the manufacture of wool for of the late Mr. Robinson in bis in England, and contends that he was meeting near Cambridge.

mised by Rapin as to the price of that article in 1337.

Our author argues 190. A Cbarge by John Clayton; a Sermon against the exportation of it, thai on by Benjamin Davies, D. D.; wirb an In every 20 thillings worth sent abroad, troductory Address, by Thomas Towie, B.D. there is above 60 chillings worth of laAll delivered on Wednesday, July 29, 1791,

bour taken from the community. WheGibe public Separation of ibe Rev. James ther the exportation of raw as well as Knight so ebe Pajtoral Office in obe Courcb of manufactured wool would, or would abiche sbe late Rey. John Rogers was not, be a public benefit to the kingdom, Palior.

remains fill undecided. Mr. Wansey WE have here the whole process of a Calvinistic ordination. The text of with his fubje&t; and to his history of

writes like a person well acquainted the sermon is Philip. ii. 1, 2. Mr. R. wool and the woollen manufakture, was panor of a congregation in South which Dr. A. appears to know little of, wark 45 years, and died, in his 74th adds many valuable and useful fa&ts. year, Sept. 2, 1799.

Such a writer deserves the ritle of

F.A.S.; and if such essays were inferi191. A British Freebolder?! Address.com big ed in the Archæologia, where Mr. W. Countrymen on Thomas Paine's “ Rigbts of has already appeared, they would imMan."

ARMED with becoming indignacion, prove it: whereas Dr. A. is too misthe Britilh Frecholder centures and ex

cellaneous and hackvied a writer.--Mr. poles the fcurrility and absurdity of W. throws out some judicious remarks Thomas Paine.

on the use of machines in the cottou and woollen manufactures.

In order to determine on the expe192. Plan submirred 10 sbe Publick by obe Society for ibe Improvement of British Wai.

diency of exportation towards encouTHE duéctors have it now in their raging the growth of wool, three very power to communicate to the publick a material points are to be considered. more particular account of their plan of First, Is it probable that, by exporta. directing their attention to the particu- tion, a greater quantity of wool will be lar breeds of theep, for the hilly parts, produced ? Second, Will more employe the lowlands, the islands, and foreign ment be found for our own labourers, countries. Among various experiments and of course more benefit accrue to the on theep take the following, for cloath. publick, from the exportation of wool ? ing item with common, unbleached, or

Third, Does the exportation of wool green linen, done over with Lord Dun. tend ac all to the advanlage of our rivals donald's car; by which the bad effects in trade, and consequently injure our of wet, more prejudicial to them than own manufacturers ? The well.incold, will be prevented. The covering formed and judicious writer of the work of each does not exceed 7d. and will, before us seems to have weighed these with proper attention, probably last two feveral particulars with mature delibe. or three years.

This plan is signed ration, and to have proved, incontella" Juhu Sinclair, Chairman."

bly, that it will be more politic to pro

hibit than to allow the exportation of 193.1V onl encouraged witbout Erporation; of, wool as, a raw material. To demonPractical Oo;erva:ima in iBoodanu one linee Arate his opinicn, he observes, p. 26,

" The

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