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In the note abovementioned Pote mired “as long as letters and taste shall thews much malevolence respecting the remain in this country.” olald: ha says, he wroce “ notes and half I am not sufficiently acquainted with notes, WHICH HE CAREFULLY OWN the Greek language to know whether ED." Whoever looks into Cooke's tranf. Cooke's translation of Hefiod be a corri lation of Hefod into English verse from one; but I am persuaded Pope himself the Greck, publithed in 1728, in twovou thought it a work of merit, when he lumes, quarto, will see a Pofticript, to fays, notwithstanding his dilike of him, which he lets his name,

as follows: “ his chief work as a translajon of Hea " Such remarks as I have received hod." without giving any character of the from my friends I have difinguished work itself. Many have thought it from my own, in justice to those by placed Cooke high in the ranks of learn. whom I have been obliged, left, by a ing and genius; fure I am there is much general acknowledgement only, such er pleasing versification in it. rors as I may have possibly com.nitted I have never seen The Battle of Ibe should, by the wrong guess of some, be Poe's in its original dress, as published in unjustly impured to them."

1723. The author, in a new edition From hence it appears, that the appli- (altered and enlarged), which was printcation of Tbeobald's name, as well as cd in 1729, says, the title “is all the reLord Pembroke's, to some of the noies, umblance each has to the other, exceptwas an act aliogerher of Cooke's.

ing some lines the fame in both, all Allow me, Mr. Urban, to rema:k, which are not eighty." In his Preface now I am on the subject of Pope's con he appears much hurt by Pope's attack duet, that he, like fome other of his po- of him in the Danciad, and lays, in his etical opponents, began life with an in poem he “has confined himself entirely dependent, though Imall fortune; bui, to the writings of men, without idly rewhilst some of such opponents in the lis fling on their persons, or dishonourterary world were plunged in all the dir abiy on their circumstances and morals ; fipation and vices of a towa life, his gout all which the author of the Dunciad is fenle and prudence, aided, no doubt. by impertinently guilty of. If I have ac. a crazy and feeble contitution, confined cuted any of immoralitys, they are such bim generally at some distance froin the as appear in their writings ; and what ! metropolis, and enabled hin to main have fayed in the character of the Spy, in tain a poet's dignity and enfe, without the second Can'o, is no more than is jufa wafting his patrimonial inheritance, It tisyable in Tie Bartle of the Poets, fiace Wos owing to that circumfiance, and the ail that is sayed, to my knowledge, is, general regulation of his life and mana fuitable to the perfon.ners, that he never was under the neces The Spy alluded to in the Preface, and fity of printing till trequint revision had expressly named in the poem itsel, was rendered his works correct ard perteet. Savage, who, it seein, lived in convivial The great celebrity he acquired by the familiarity with many of Pope's literany publication of his fult puces obained enemies, and, at the same time, courteel fubfcrip:ions for his tranflacion of Homer, Pope with much servility. He is said to which added greatly to inis furtune, and have furniled Pope with most of the priDO O knew better than himícil bow to vatc antcdotes of the authors mentioned inake the most of his tubsequent works. in the Dunciad. Corte, in a vote to his Lord Chefsrfeldt, who had a rentret poem lays, “M: Pore seems to have knowlexige of him, fais, in Characters had the same perton in his eye, where, pubiifhce after that nube Lourd's deaiii, speaking of him It, le fars,

he iva: the most iniable of the genus 6 Nor like a puppy diggled thro’the town, irritabiie vartit, offended with wifes, To fe'ch and carry in 1003 up and down." and never forgeting or forgiving thein."

Epiftolu Dr. Arbubno. Buri mufi be coniciled he load allo some In The Battle of De Poets the coinbaamaite qualties. If we lament that a tants art orar a cithes Ode; the 11.15d toitudan", ani to free tren

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Worth in all shapes he views with envious ibe Poets; and he says, “ whatever idea eyes,

he would have annexed to that reflexion, A Vanbrugb witty, and Godolpbin wise : I ftill entertain the same opinion of the Nor could the foremost of the sons of men

writings of thele two gentlemen that I Escape his ribbald, and licentious pen; did then. Mr. Welped has not writ He who protected, in the doubtful hour,

much, and what he has published is but The land of freedom from tyrannic pow'r: Hail ever-honour'd thade, whose sacred name of his, I speak of his poetical pieces,

Jittle known : yet in most that we hare Shall live, till worlds decay, the boast of Fame! As right requires, this Marlb'ro', is hy lot.”

there is that delicacy, that language On the other side are arranged Wela

which is peculiar to the province of pofed, Tickell, Pbilips, Dennis, &c. He

erry, which will alwavs give pleasure to

those who read and taste. Mr. Ambrose thus describes Tickell: « Tickell, bless'a bard, by Addison approv'd, which he owes to superior merit only, in

Philips has already acquired a fame A leader bold, and by the Muses luv'd, Took in resplendent arms tlie martial field,

which falle taste and cabal have had no The head of Homer painted on his shield;

Saare ; and all the blasts of envy, malice, The lines so strong the master pencil speak, and of ignorance, prevail no more against All with he'd draw'd at length th’immortal him than a fquall of wind against a foGreek.

rift-oak : the reputation of his writings Of Dennis, he says,

will increase with time." “ Dennis, whose veins with youthful vigour Pope calls The Battle of the Poots, conflow,

temptuoullv, a ibing. The next edition, Yirm as an oak beneath the weight of snow, published some years afterwards, which True foe to vice, of modern bards the dread, retained only about cighty lines of the Who spurious wit has oft' in triumph led, original poem, fecms to justify his opiRears, as Apollo and the Nine inspire, nion of it. - With hands tremendous the vindictive fire.”

In looking hack over this letter, I am I have given these extracts, Mr. Ur. perlu aded, Mr. Urban, it will take up ban, not as thinking them the best in the as much room in your Magazine as I poem, but that your readers may judge have a right to expect; I shal), therefore, of Cooke's genius and versification, whose poltpone my further account of Cooke wor are but little known. The fimile and his writings to some future opportu. in the second verse of the descriptiou of nity.

JOSEPH MAWBEY. old Dennis, the critick, is as truly poctical as any I have met with in any au REMARKS ON ENGLISH BARDS. thor; and there are, in many parts of (Continuud from p. 982.)

ICHARD credit the works of more popular poets.

In a note to this poem, as printed in is less remembered, deferves a better his Poems in 1742, Cocke says, “the fate. Kent, has the honour of his birth reader mult observe, that the author of and residence; his family were eminent this poem alludes to none of Mr. Pope's there; but the accounts of it given by writings since the firft publication of the Hafted, in his Hittory, are so broken, Dunciad, either in commendation or scattered, and inaccurate, that it requires censure : but he is very senbible that Mir. fome time to underliand them. Ithall Pope has fince published what are objects endeavour, therefore, to give a more fucof both in a high degree." And in a cinct and clear statement of ir. John Postscript he says, “ a poem, under the Lovelace polished a manor io Beiberlien, title of The Buttle of the Poets, was writ Kent, which took his own name, in the and published by me in the very early time of Edward III. (Hafi. 1:1. 239). part of my youth, which was re-printed From him descended a race illuvious for in Dublin the same year in which it was their military talents. Io the time of published in London: this was before the Henry VI. a younger branch of this publication of the Dunciad.And far- house, Richard Lovelace, of Queenlithe, ther op he says, “I cannot conceive very London, bought and lettled at the manor highly of Mr. Pope's philosophy or dig. of Bayfordi, in Sittingh urne (Halt. II. nicy of mind, if he could be provoked by 612). His son Lancelot had three fons ; what a boy writ concerning his transa- the third was ancestor of the Lords Love. tion of Homer, and in verles which gave lace (whose progenitor built the tine old no promise of long duration,"

house, out of the ruins of a convent, at He cakes notice, in the said Perscript, Hurity, in Berks, wich Spanish money of what Pope has said, that Pbilips and gained in an expedition with Sir Francis · Welfted are the heroes of Ibe Battle of Drake, temp. Eliz. (See Gouglis Cam.

uca)

den). William, fecond son, and at Piilon make," &c. (Wood's Ath. II. 227). length heir of Lancelot, was father of As this little poem appears to me by William Lovelace (fecond fon), ferjeant far the most beautiful composition of its at law, of the Whire Friars *, Canter. kind in the English language, and as ic bury, who died in 1576, leaving issue is printed incorrectly in his Poems, p. Sir William Lovelace, who seems to have 97, and not always right in the Specimens succeeded (I cannot tell hov;) to the seat of early Englib Poeiry, lately publilhed, of the eldest branch at Bethersden. By I beg for once that here, in this place Elizabeh, daughter of Edward Aucher, (and not among your Poetry), you will of Bourne, elit. (hy Mabel, daugh- give room for the following copy of it. ter of Sir Thomas Wrothe, knt.) he left TO ALTHEA. From PRISON. issue Sir William Lovelace, who obtain SET BY DR. JOHN WILSON. ed a leat a: Woolwich by marrving When Love with unconfined wings Anne, daughter and heir of Sir William

Hovers within my gates, Barnes, of thar place (by Dorothy, And my livine Althea brings daughter of Sir Pecer Manwood, of St. To whisper at my grates; Stephen's, n-ar Canterbury, fon of Sir When I lie tangled in her hair, Roger, Chief Baron of the Exchequer).

Aud fetter'd with her eye,

The birds that wanton in the air
By her Sir Willain was father of Col.
Richard Lovelace, the poet, of Bethers.

Know no such liberty.
den, and of H ver, in the parith of When fluwing cups run swiftly round
Kingsdowne, near Wrotham (Hafi. I.

With woe-allaying themes, 287, 289). He was born in 1018, and Our careleri heads with roses bound, educated at the Charter-house, and ac

Our hearts with loyal flames;

When thirity grief in wine we steep, Oxfori. Iis polished manners, and the uncommon beauty of his person, for off Fishes that tipple in the Deep

When healths and draughts go free, by a graceful diffidence, rendered him at

Koow no such liberty. this time the delight of the women. And in 1636 (two stars afterwards), when

When (like confined linnets) I the King and Queen came to Oxford, The mercy, sweetness, majesty,

With Thriller notes thall sing being, ainongst other persons of quality,

And glories of my King; creared Master of Arts, he had an oppor When I shall voice aloud how good tunity, by a wider conversacion, of dis.

He is, how great should be, playing his genius and his heart, and be.

Th' enlarged winds that curb the flood came as great a favourite of the male lex Know no such liberty. as he already was of the lemale. Froin

Stoce walls çlo not a prison make, the University, le attended with great Nor iron bars a cage; splendour the Court, and became a tol Minds innocent and quiet take dier under the Lord Goring. “ After That for an hermitage. the pacification at Berwick, he retired," If I have freedom in my love, fays Wood, “ to his native country, and And in my soul am free, took jo:feffion of his eftares at Lovelace. Angels alone, that soar above, place, in Betherlden, at Canterbury, enjoy such liberty. Chart, Halden, &c. worth at least 500l. After three or four months imprison. per annum; about which time he was ment, he had his liberty upon bail of made choice of by the whole body of the 40,000l. not to ftir out of the lines of county of Kent at an aflize, to deliver cuminunication without a pals from the the Kentijo Petition to the Hou'e, of Speaker. But during this confinement Commons, for the reitoring the King to he lived beyond the income of his estate, his righ's, and for fetiling the govern to keep up the credit and reputation of ment, &c. For which piece of service the King's cause, by furnishing, men he was committed to the Gaie-house at with horses and arms, and by relieving Westminster, where he made that cele- ingenious men in want, whether schobrated long, called, Stone Walls ao not a lars, muficians, or soldiers. He furnished

also his two brothers, Col. Francis Love. * The White Friars (wbich by a late trial at Maidstone was determined to be extra.pa

lace and Capt. Willian Lovelace (after.

wards slain at Carmarthen), with money rochial) was after wards the seat of the Tur. ners, who also for a series of generations for the King's cause; and his other bro. were practisers at the bar. Tlie heiress car. ther, Dudly Posthumus Lovelace, he sied it in marriage to the present David Pa- supported in Holland to study tactics and pillon, esq. of Acrise, who told it to Wilc fortification in that school of war. liam Hammond, esg. of St. Albans, for

CLIFFORDIENSIS. whom it forms a handsome mansion.

(To be continued.)

AVERAGE

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By the Standard Winchester Bushel of Eight Gallons, and of Oatmeal per Boll of 140lbs. Avoirdupois, from the Returns received in the Week ended the 19th of November.

Wheat. Rye. Barley. Oats. Oatmeal. Bigs. Pease. Beans. Districts.

d. S.
d. s.

d. s.
London
Is 513 413 61 2 41-

91 3

9 I Ņ LAND COUNTIE'S. Middlesex, 5 91

4

2 Surrey,

5 41 3

8

3 4 4
Hertford,
5 4

6 2

5
Predford,

4
3

3 51 2 3'50
Huntingdon,
3 4

3
Northampton,
5 3 103

3 II
Rutland,
4) 3 9, 3 9 4:47 91

7 4
Leicester,

3 II
441 4!

5 O4
Nottingham,

8
14
5.25 5

4
Derhy,

1ο
4

7,25
5.

10 4 7 Statford,

5 II

4
2 628

6
5 4

II
Salor,

5
4 4 3

4,50

3

6 Hereford,

5 24

10
5

1 Worcester,

6
4 S 4

9

4 5 4
Warwick,

5
4

3
Wilts,
3

8
Berks,

3

4 33
Oxford *,
Bucks,
5
2

4

3 5 Brecon, 5 3 4 I .8:8

3

4

o Montgomery, 5 1

3 5 7136

3 5
Radnor,

5 91
3

3 7 * No Inspectors yet appointed.

MARI TIME COUNTIES.
Effex,
5 3 9 3

5:41

3 83 9 Ist Kent,

5 4 3 93

6
4

4 4 3 5 Suflex,

3 5, 2 4

3
Suffolk,

5
3 1
3 3 437

3 93
Cambridge,

5
1 2 I. I

3
8

3 3d Norfolk,

5

3

o
3
1

73
Lincolu,

5
2
3 5. 3

8
038

7 3
5
3 9 3 3 2

II

3
Curham,

4 II
3 TO
3 4 2

1,29
8

3 9
4 9 3 9

10 2 020 IT 4 O! 3 3 114 6

5

214 4 Larcaster,

3

11 Chester,

5 7

3 9 7
Flint,

9
3
I

3

7 Denbigh,

7
3

3 5 4 Sth Anglefea,

3

6.29 9 Carnarvon,

31

4
Merioneth,

6
3

3
Cardigan,
5 3 3

8
4
4 3 43

0 1
Carmarthen, 5 3

3

5 Glamorgull,

5 5

3

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5

3
6
6

IO ,

3
Ioth
Somerset,

5
6
3 I
6

6

3 Monmouth,

5

3 9
Devon,
4 11

IO

922
Cornwall,
5

91
5 4

3 I
3

4
Hants,

II

3
1 2 21

3
AVERAGE OF ENGLAND AND WALES.
Per Bushel 5 4 3 811 3 432 PerBoll 4 411 3 11
Per Quarter

8
2117 2132 871 32 4 131 10

AVERAGE

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