Rome, Season One: History Makes Television

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Monica Silveira Cyrino
John Wiley & Sons, Mar 25, 2009 - Literary Criticism - 272 pages
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Rome, Season One: History Makes Television examines thefirst season of the HBO-BBC collaboration, Rome, in acollection of thought-provoking essays by some of the world’smost influential scholars in the fields of classical antiquity andpopular culture.

  • Examines the first season of the HBO-BBC collaboration,Rome, in a collection of 17 thought-provoking essays by someof the world’s most influential scholars in the fields ofclassical antiquity and popular culture
  • Focuses on the award-winning first season’s historicalframework, visual and narrative style, contemporary thematicovertones, and influence on popular culture
  • Addresses the artistic values, and roles of the script, sets,and actors
  • Reveals how the series Rome ‘makes history’in terms of representing the past on screen and producinginnovative and influential television.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Televising Antiquity From You Are There to Rome
11
Making History in Rome Ancient vs Modern Perspectives
29
What I Learned as an Historical Consultant for Rome
42
Romes Opening Titles Triumph Spectacle and Desire
49
The Fog of War The Army in Rome
61
Caesars Soldiers The Pietas of Vorenus and Pullo
78
Becoming AugustusThe Education of Octavian
87
Her First Roman A Cleopatra for Rome
141
Gowns and Gossip Gender and Class Struggle in Rome
153
The Gender Gap Religious Spaces in Rome
168
Staging Interiors in Romes Villas
179
Latin in the Movies and Rome
193
Spectacle of Sex Bodies on Display in Rome
207
Vice is Nice Rome and Deviant Sexuality
219
Bibliography
232

Not Some Cheap Murder Caesars Assassination
100
Womens Politics in the Streets of Rome
117
Atia and the Erotics of Authority
130

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About the author (2009)

Monica S. Cyrino is Professor of Classics at the University of New Mexico. She is the author of Big Screen Rome (Blackwell, 2005) and In Pandora’s Jar: Lovesickness in Early Greek Poetry (1995), and has appeared as an academic consultant on the television show History vs. Hollywood on The History Channel. Dr. Cyrino was awarded the American Philological Association’s national teaching award in classics (1998–1999).

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