Jarocho's Soul: Cultural Identity and Afro-Mexican Dance

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University Press of America, 2004 - Social Science - 172 pages
Brown-skinned men and women move across Mexico's national stages dancing the folkloric jarocho, a symbolic blend of Spanish, Native American, and African cultures. Jarocho's Soul: Cultural Identity and Afro-Mexican Dance traces the evolution and transformation of an Afro-Mexican dance form into a national cultural icon. It is an ethnographic study that compares and contrasts Mexican performance of national identity with Untied States dance styles. The book uses the image of the jarocho as a window to explore the phenomena of racial/cultural mixing that is endemic to Mexico and increasingly apparent in the politics and aesthetics of United States cultural performances.
 

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Contents

IX
21
X
28
XI
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XII
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XIII
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XIV
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XV
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XVI
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XXII
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XXIII
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XXIV
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XXVI
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XXVII
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XXVIII
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XXIX
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XVII
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XVIII
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XIX
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XX
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XXI
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XXX
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XXXI
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XXXII
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Page 2 - The process of mestizaje, sometimes seen as basically racial, is in fact social; “mestizo” is an achieved as well as an ascribed status--even though achievement may be difficult and, in the case of communities, may span decades.

About the author (2004)

Anita González is Assistant Professor in the School of Theatre, Florida State University.

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