The Mongol Empire: A Historical Encyclopedia [2 volumes]: A Historical Encyclopedia

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Timothy May
ABC-CLIO, Nov 7, 2016 - History - 636 pages
1 Review

In the 13th century, Chinggis Khan rose to power, leading an empire of a million people and defeating surrounding regions with much larger populations. This compendium follows the achievements—and failures—of the Mongol Empire from the birth of Chinggis Khan in 1162 to the formation of the successor states that came from the dissolution of the world power in the 16th century: the Yuan Empire in East Asia; the Chaghatai Khanate in Central Asia; the Ilkhanate in the Middle East; and the Jochid or Kipchak Khanate in the Pontic-Caspian Steppes, known as the Golden Horde.

Through some 180 entries, this two-volume set covers every aspect of Mongol civilization, organizing content into eight sections: government and politics, organization and administration, individuals, groups and organizations, key events, military, objects and artifacts, and key places. Each section is accompanied by an essay introducing the topic in the context of the Mongol Empire. The work also includes a chronology, a number of annotated primary documents, and a bibliography.

 

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Crappy and trash, waste of my time, too many pages, intelligent facts but lack of text evidence. It could have been good if it mentioned Temujin's real name and more valuable and useful facts about his family history, his wife, conquests and his ruling history, it's way too expensive for this lack of creativity in this book:( . 

Contents

Government and Politics
1
Organization And Administration
61
Individuals
121
Groups and Organizations
193
Index
259
Cover page
305
Halftitle page
i
Series page
ii
Key Events
1
Military
61
Objects and Artifacts
121
Key Places
161
Primary Documents
215
Appendix
259
Glossary
263
Bibliography
269

Title page
iii
Copyright page
iv
Contents
v
Editor and Contributors
285
Index
287
Copyright

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About the author (2016)

Timothy May, PhD, is professor of Eurasian history and associate dean of the college of arts and letters at the University of North Georgia.

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