The Description of England: The Classic Contemporary Account of Tudor Social Life

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Courier Corporation, 1968 - History - 512 pages
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Originally written as part of an introduction to Holinshed's Chronicles, this history provides an unparalleled account of life in Shakespeare's England. Its detailed accounts address nearly every aspect of 16th-century life, including food and diet, laws, clothing, crime and punishment, castles, antiquities, animals, languages, inns and thoroughfares, and many other topics.
 

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Contents

Of the Number of Bishoprics and Their
41
Of the Partition of England into Shires
81
Of the Food and Diet of the English
113
Of Castles and Holds
220
Of Palaces Belonging to the Prince
224
Of Armor and Munition
233
Of the Navy of England
239
Of Fairs and Markets
246
Of Our Saffron and the Dressing Thereof
348
Of Quarries of Stone for Building
356
Of Sundry Minerals
357
Of Metals To Be Had in Our Land
364
Of Precious Stones
371
Of Salt Made in England
375
Of Their Apparel and Attire
377
Of Our Account of Time and Her Parts
379

Of Parks and Warrens 153
258
Of Gardens and Orchards
263
Of Waters Generally
271
Of Woods and Iarshes
275
Of Baths and Hot Wells
284
Of Antiquities Found
297
Tbe Description of England continued I Of Cattle Kept for Profit
305
Of Fish Usually Taken upon Our Coasts
314
Of Hawks and Ravenous Fowls
330
Of Venomous Beasts
333
Of Our English Dogs and Their Qualities
339
Of Our Principal Fairs and Markets
391
Of Our Inns and Thoroughfares
397
Tbe Description of Britain excerpts Table of Contents 4O VI Of the Languages Spoken in This Island 41I XI The Description of the Thames and Suc...
409
Of Such Falls of Waters as Join with the
410
as Fall into the Same in part
418
between Humber and the Thames in part
423
Of the Four Highways Sometime Made in Britain
441
Of the Manner of Measuring the Length
453
Comparison with Others in part
459
Index
467
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Page 526 - ... palaces, navigation, &c. but now sallow, &c. are rejected, and nothing but oak any where regarded ; and yet see the change ; for when our houses were builded of willow, then had we oaken men ; but now that our houses are come to be made of oak, our men are not only become willow, but a great many altogether of straw, which is a sore alteration.

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About the author (1968)

Georges Edelen is Professor of English at Indiana University.

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