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Books Books 1 - 10 of 30 on I thought they had better keep quiet. Vere is with Millbank, and we are going back....
" I thought they had better keep quiet. Vere is with Millbank, and we are going back to Coningsby directly; but we thought it best to show, finding on our arrival that there were all sorts of rumours about. "
Young England: Being Vivian Grey, Coningsby, Sybil, Tancred - Page 62
by Benjamin Disraeli (Earl of Beaconsfield) - 1904
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Coningsby, Or, The New Generation

Benjamin Disraeli (Earl of Beaconsfield) - Great Britain - 1844 - 159 pages
...rumours about. I think it will be best to report at once to our tutor, for he will be sure to he-.r something." " I would if I were you." CHAPTER X. WHAT...comprehensive speculations ! In what fanciful schemes to obtam the friendship of Coningsby had Millbank in his reveries often indulged ! What combinations that...
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Collected edition of the novels and tales by ... B. Disraeli, Volume 2

1870
...arrival that there were all sorts of rumours about. I think it will be best to report at once to my tutor, for he will be sure to hear something.' ' I...importance than the most sublime and comprehensive specnlations ! In what fanciful schemes to obtain the friendship of Coningsby had Millbank in his reveries...
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Coningsby

Benjamin Disraeli (Earl of Beaconsfield) - 1881
...arrival that there were all sorts of rumours about. I think it will be bust to report at once to my tutor, for he will be sure to hear something.' ' I...The least are of greater importance than the most Mublimc and comprehensive speculations ! In what fanciful schemes to obtain the friendship of Coningsby...
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Collected Edition of the Novels and Tales, Volume 2

Benjamin Disraeli - English fiction - 1881
...for he will be sure to hear something.' ' 1 would if I were yon.' CHAPTER X. WHAT wonderful tilings are events ! The least are of greater importance than...speculations ! In what fanciful schemes to obtain tke friendship of Coningsby had Millbank in his reveries often indulged ! What combinations that were...
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Wit and Wisdom

Benjamin Disraeli (Earl of Beaconsfield) - English prose literature - 1881 - 382 pages
...from the sea. The sky and the ocean have two natures like ourselves.—(' Herbert') Venetia. EVENTS. What wonderful things are events ! The least are of...importance than the most sublime and comprehensive speculations.—Coningsby. Life is not dated merely by years. Events are sometimes the best calendar....
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Eclectic Magazine: Foreign Literature, Volume 42; Volume 105

John Holmes Agnew, Henry T. Steele, Walter Hilliard Bidwell - 1885
...because they were ? " What wonderful things are Events," wrote Lord Beaconsfield in " Coningsby ;" " the least are of greater importance than the most sublime and comprehensive speculations." To say this is to go perhaps too far ; certainly it is to go farther than Carlyle, who none the less...
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The Living Age ..., Volume 166

1885
...events ! " • History U philosophy teaching by exampleğ. wrote Lord Beaconsfield in " Coningsby ; " " the least are of greater importance than the most sublime and comprehensive speculations." To say this is to go perhaps too far ; certainly it is to go farther than Carlyle, who none the less...
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The Contemporary Review, Volume 47

Literature - 1885
...simply because they were ? " What wonderful things are Events/' wrote Lord Beaconsfield in " Coningsby;" "the least are of greater importance than the most sublime and comprehensive speculations." To say this is to go perhaps too far ; certainly it is to go farther than Carlyle, who none the less...
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Obiter Dicta ...: Milton. Pope. Johnson. Burke. The muse of history. Charles ...

Augustine Birrell - English literature - 1887
...simply because they were ? ' What wonderful things are events,' wrote Lord Beaconsfield in Coningsby ; 'the least are of greater importance than the most sublime and comprehensive speculations.' To say this is to go perhaps too far ; certainly it is to go farther than Carlyle, who none the less...
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Obiter Dicta: Second Series, Volume 2

Augustine Birrell - English literature - 1887 - 289 pages
...because they were ? ' What wonderful ' things are events,' wrote Lord Beaconsfield in * Coningsby ; ' the least are of greater importance ' than the most sublime and comprehensive ' speculations.' To say this is to go perhaps too far ; certainly it is to go farther than Carlyle, who none the less...
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