Cobbett's Parliamentary Debates, During the ... Session of the ... Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and of the Kingdom of Great Britain ..., Volume 6

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R. Bagshaw, 1812 - Great Britain
 

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Page 259 - Were it joined with the legislative, the life, liberty, and property of the subject would be in the hands of arbitrary judges, whose decisions would be then regulated only by their own opinions, and not by any fundamental principles of law ; which, though legislators may depart from, yet judges are bound to observe. Were it joined with the executive, this union might soon be an overbalance for the legislative.
Page 1041 - Treaty signed this day. It shall be ratified, and the ratifications shall be exchanged at the same time. In witness whereof, the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed the same, and have affixed thereto their seals.
Page 259 - IN this distinct and separate existence of the judicial power in a peculiar body of men, nominated indeed, but not removable at pleasure, by the crown, consists one main preservative of the public liberty ; which cannot subsist long in any state, unless the administration of common justice be in some degree separated both from the legislative and also from the executive power.
Page 259 - ... he looked upon the independence and uprightness of the judges, as essential to the impartial administration of justice ; as one of the best securities of the rights and liberties of his subjects; and as most conducive to the honour of the crown.
Page 259 - I. c. 10. which abolished the court of star chamber, effectual care is taken to remove all judicial power out of the hands of the king's privy council; who, as then was evident from recent instances, might soon be inclined to pronounce that for law, which was most agreeable to the prince or his officers. Nothing therefore is more to be avoided, in a free constitution, than uniting the provinces of a judge and a minister of state.
Page 1041 - The present separate article shall have the same force and value as if it were inserted, word for word, in the treaty signed this day, and shall be ratified at the same time. In faith whereof we, the undersigned, by virtue of our respective full powers, have signed the present separate article, and affixed thereto the seals of our arms.
Page 983 - Had we formed a permanent army in the beginning, which, by the continuance of the same men in service, had been capable of discipline, we never should have had to retreat with a handful of men across the Delaware...
Page 1029 - ... that long before that hour there was a very numerous attendance of peers, and the space before the throne was crowded with the members of the House of Commons who had been most active and determined in their opposition to the measure. No sooner had the chancellor taken his seat on the woolsack, than the deputy usher of the black rod appeared at the bar, and announced a message from the Commons.
Page 1041 - IN the name of the Most Holy and Undivided Trinity:— His Majesty the King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland...
Page 103 - That an humble address be presented to his Majesty, that his Majesty will be graciously pleased to give directions; that a Minister may be sent to Paris, to treat with those persons who exercise provisionally the functions of Executive Government in France, touching such points as may be in discussion between his Majesty and his Allies, and the French Nation...

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