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To fright her into madness? Think not, countrymen,
Indignant virtue can survive pollution !
By her own hand a Roman wife can fall. (Stabs herself.
'Tis to the heart! Tarquin, the blow was thine! (Falls.

Col. Beloved, unhappy wife ! What hast thou done? Luc. A deed of glory. Now, my husband, nowWith transport can

I
press
thee to

my

bosom. Father and kinsmen, ye can own me now ! My pure soul springs from its detested prison ! Virtue exults!' The gods applaud my daring! And to our dear, loved babe, 1 can bequeath A mother's noblest gift—a spotless name ! [Dies.

Luc. Staff of my age! Gone, gone, forever gone ! A wretched father's last and only joy ! Come, death, strike here! Your shaft were welcome

now!

Snatch me from earth to my poor, lost, loved child !
Col. My wife! my wife! Dear, dear, wronged, mur.

dered wife !
Let me be rooted here in endless sorrow-
Whu, who shall dare to mourn her loss like me ?

Enter BRUTUS, L. Bru. I dare,-and so dare

honest Roman. The Scene then proceeds as printed in the preceding pages.

every

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ALSO THE STAGE BUSINESS, CASTS OF CHARACTERS

COSTUMES, RELATIVE POSITIONS, ETC.

NEW YORK:

WILLIAM TAYLOR & Co.,

No. 18 ANN-STREET.

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COSTUMES.
The Costumes are those of the present day, Mr. Simpson

wearing a plain gray or brown suit.

EXITS AND ENTRANCES.
R. means Right; L. Left; R. D. Right Door; L. D. Left Door,
S. E. Second Entrance; V. E. Upper Entrance; M. D. Middle Door

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RELATIVE POSITIONS.
R., means Right; L., Left; C., Centre; R. C., Right of Centre !
L. C. Left of Contre.

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EDITORIAL INTRODUCTION.

l'h13 sterling little comedy, from the pen of Poole, has kept possession of the stage for the last twenty-five years, and from its intrinsic excellence, is entitled to a place in the “ Modern Standard Drama."

It has been said by an able critic of the day, that “we are deficient in comedy, because we are without characters in real life.” Society has certainly become so fused in its character, that an uniform phase is outwardly presented to the world. Our auguiar points wear off by attrition; and individual eccentricities are now less prominent, than in the days when our early comic writers found such ample materials for their imperishable works. There are, doubtless, less subjects afforded for the display of strong and marked characters on the stage, in this age of refinement and intellectual progress, than were presented when the grades of society were more distinctly separated, and each class furnished specimens which the skilful dramatist could convert into a source of infinite entertainment to his audiences. And yet the author of " Simpson & Co.” has contrive ed to sclect from the ordinary walks of society a few characters of an entirely common-place character, and by the aid of elegant and sprightly language, dramatic incidents, and humorous situations, to produce a piece that invariably amuses an audience, and is likely to maintain its position on the stage, as long as genuine comic humour is relished by the public.

The original cast of this comedy combined the talents of Terry, John Cooper, Mrs. Glover, Mrs. Davidson, Mrs. W West, and Mrs. Orger-all artists, in that sense of the term in which only it should be used; and the long career of success the piece experienced on its first production at Drury Lane, may in

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