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bless you !

my brother-wi-very well-and-yes---I'll do't-I -will-I oul. (Calls.] Brother Littleton. (Coke advances R.) You-love-a-that lady? Lit. Yes.

Tom. Am not surprised at it—and a suppose you know that she loves you—she told me so—but would you, for her sake, quit gay London ?-would you live for her only ?

Lit. I would, and will.

Tom. She's worthy of a prince's throne. Brother, oh give her, then, an honest heart, love her as 1-as she loves you, ahem! (Pauses.] I-Littleton, here is every paper you ever signed to me; 'ave never counted them, foi they sickened me to look at. A brought them doon here thinking to restore them to you on my-but

-no matter, turn a foolish vanity and-(Becomes abstracted, after a pause, passes his hand across his eyes,1—'tis past-take them, Littleton, take back my father's gift-no-I'll buy no brother's birthright wi' a mess of pottage ; and besides, it wouldn't do for you to go to your rich wife a beggar, and—and-Littleton, I—{Chokedly and whispering.] God

Shakes his hand. Lit. Tom-brother-my friends, I–

Tom. Seizing his hand.) Hush !-h-{Points to the paper,] between ourselves, not a word, not even to minister; such things should be sacred, as our mother's grave -not a word.

[They go up affectionately. Lord P. I'll hear no more. I disapprove of the match -the young man is a pauper, and possesses no rank to entitle him.

Lit. My lord !

Tom. Not quite a pauper either-my lord, since he possesses nigh two thousand pounds a-year--and is, and ever will be, my only heir to twice as much again.

[Shouts without, L.

Enter BOB, L.
Bob. They're waiting to chair the member.
Lord P. Lord Charles-make haste !

Bob. Not at all. [Loud shouts outside" Hurrah for Coke ! Coke !

Bob. Do you hear ?
Lord P. Impossible ! what's the state of the poll ?
Bup. Here it is, at the close, Coko, 218, Roebuck, 2.

may save him

Lord P. I've been-[Aside,] stop, I may gain over the new member.--[Aloud. Mr. Coke, my hasty expression

Roe. How's this, not married yet ?

Lord P. Ha ! Can it be possible ? then I yet. Colonel, things have assumed an aspect, which

Enter LADY POMPION from house. Lady P. What is all this?

Bob. [Aside to Roebuck.] All right, my lord ; [Crosses to the Earl,] see, settle the Earl.-Aloud.] If your lordship will allow me to explain our interview last evening to the countėss.

Lord P. Not a word.
Bob. The boy, Robert

Lord P. I beseech-my dear children, may heaven Lless your felicitous union.

Rur. May I unite 'em, may I ? come here, (Calls Lady Alice R., and Miss Rocket, L., takes them under his arms] bless your young faces, your smiles fall like sunshine on my old heart; this is a delicious moment ! [Turns round, thereby bringing Miss Rocket to R., and La. dy Alice L., pushes them towards their wrong

lovers ;

then he turns to the audience.] There! bless you! may heaven shower its blessings on you, as it now does on me. (Roebuck and Littleton Coke exchange Miss Rocket and Lady Alice behind Rural's back.] Here's a feast of joy! look at this happiness! (Turns round to Roebuck, L., sees him embracing Miss Rocket. Hollo! bless me! [Turns round, R., and sees Littleton Coke embracing Lady Alice.) Good gracious me! ha! what, have I mistaken ?-and-youah! I see

-old heads and young hearts ! well, no matter - bless you that way. (To audience.) I see many young hearts before me, I hope you're all in love I domand that I could unite you all

. Well, I bequeath you to the conduct of the old heads; and to them I would say,

did you ever see a little child leading an old blind man? how can age best repay such a charity? why, by guiding the blindness of youth, which is love: this is the last debt due from an old head to a young heart. DISPOSITION OF THE CHARACTERS AT THE FALL OF

THE CURTAIN. Tom, LADY P. LORD P. Lit. LADY A, RURALO KATE. Poe.

L.)

TAE ERD.

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WITH THE STAGE BUSINESS, CAST OF CHARACTERS,

COSTUMES, RELATIVE POSITIONS, ETC.

NEW-YORK:
WILLIAM TAYLOR & CO.,

No. 18 ANN-STREET.

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