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HORRORS OF FILIAL INGRATITUDE

BELOVED, Thy sister's naught: 0, she hath'tied Sharp-tooth'd unkindness, like a vulture, here I can scarce speak to thee; thou'lt not believe, Of how deprav'd a quality--O!

KING LEAR, A. 2, s. 4.

HUMAN INEQUALITIES. So, oft it chances in particular men, That for some vicious mole of nature in them, As, in their birth, (wherein they are not guilty, Since nature cannot choose his origin,) By the o'ergrowth of some complexion, Oft breaking down the pales and forts of reason; Or by some habit, that too much o’erleavens The form of plausive manners ;—that these

men, Carrying, I say, the stamp of one defect; Being nature's livery, or fortune's star, Their virtues else (be they as pure as grace, As infinite as man may undergo,) Shall in the general censure take corruption From that particular fault: The dram of base Doth all the noble substance often doubt, To his own scandal.

HAMLET, A. 1, 8.4.

HOW TO SHAME THE EVIL SPIRIT. GLENDOWER. I can call spirits from the

vasty deep. HOTSPUR. Why, so can I; or so can any man: But will they come, when you do call for them ?

N

GLEND. Why, I can teach you, cousin, to

command The devil. Hot. And I can teach thee, coz, to shame

the devil, By telling truth; Tell truth, and shame the

devil. — If thou have power to raise him, bring him hither, And I'll be sworn, I have power to shame him

hence. O, while you live, tell truth, and shame the devil.

K. HENRY IV., PART 1., A. 3, s. 1.

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HUMAN PARROTS.

CONTENT yourself: God knows, I lov'd my niece;
And she is dead, slander'd to death by villains;
That dare as well answer a man, indeed,
As I dare take a serpent by the tongue:
Boys, apes, braggarts, Jacks, milksops!
What, man! I know them, yea,
And what they weigh, ever to the utmost scruple;
Scambling, out-facing, fashion-mong’ring boys,
That lie, and cog, and flout, deprave and slander,
Go antickly, and show outward hideousness,
And speak off half a dozen dangerous words,
How they might hurt their enemies, if they durst,
And this is all.

MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING, A. 5, s. l.

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HUMAN VARIETIES.

By two-headed Janus, Nature hath fram'd strange fellows in her time: Some that will evermore peep through their eyes

:

And laugh, like parrots, at a bag-piper :
And other of such vinegar aspect,
That they'll not show their teeth in way of smile,
Though Nestor swear the jest be laughable.

MERCHANT OF VENICE, A. 1, s. l.

HUMOROUS RECIPE FOR PRO

DUCING HUMILITY. GRUMIO. No, no; forsooth, I dare not, for

my life.

KATHARINE. The more my wrong,

the more his spite appears : What, did he marry me to famish me? Beggars, that come unto my father's door, Upon entreaty, have a present alms; If not, elsewhere they meet with charity: But I,—who never knew how to entreat,Nor never needed that I should entreat, Am stary'd for meat, giddy for lack of sleep; With oaths kept waking, and with brawling fed: And that which spites me more than all these

wants, He does it under name of perfect love; As who should say,—if I should sleep, or eat, 'Twere deadly sickness, or else present death.I pr’ythee go, and get me some repast; I care not what, so it be wholesome food.

Gru. What say you to a neat's foot ?
Kath. 'Tis passing good; I pr’ythee let me

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have it.
GRU. I fear, it is too cholerick a meat:-
How say you to a fat tripe, finely broil'd ?

KATH. I like it well; good Grumio, fetch it

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me.

GRU. I cannot tell; I fear, 'tis cholerick. What say you to a piece of beef, and mustard ?

Kath. A dish that I do love to feed upon. GRU. Ay, but the mustard is too hot a little. KATH. Why, then the beef, and let the

mustard rest. GRU. Nay, then I will not; you shall have

the mustard, Or else you get no beef of Grumio. KATH. Then both, or one, or anything thou

wilt. Gru. Why, then the mustard without the

beef. Kath. Go, get thee gone, thou false deluding slave,

[Beats him. That feed’st me with the very name of meat: Sorrow on thee, and all the pack of you, That triumph thus upon my misery! Go, get thee gone, I say.

TAMING OF THE SHREW, A. 4, s. 3.

HUSBAND'S LOVE. My queen! my mistress ! O, lady, weep no more ; lest I give cause To be suspected of more tenderness Than doth become a man! I will remain The loyal'st husband that did e'er plight troth. My residence in Rome, at one Philario's ; Who to my father was a friend, to me Known but by letter: thither write, my queen, And with mine eyes I'll drink the words you

send, Though ink be made of gall.

CYMBELINE, A. 1, s. 2.

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HUSBAND'S REMORSE FOR UNJUST

SUSPICION.

O, Thus she stood, Even with such life of majesty, (warm life, As now it coldly stands,) when first I woo'd her! I am asham’d: Does not the stone rebuke me, For being more stone than it ?—0, royal piece, There's magick in thy majesty; which has My evils conjur'd to remembrance; and From thy admiring daughter took the spirits, Standing like stone with thee!

WINTER'S TALE, A. 5, s. 3.

HYPOCRISY A BOTTLED SPIDER. Poor painted queen, vain flourish of my

fortune! Why strew'st thou sugar on that bottled spider, Whose deadly web ensnareth thee about ? Fool, fool! thou whet’st a knife to kill thyself. The day will come, that thou shalt wish for me To help thee curse this pois’nous bunch-back'd toad.

K. RICHARD III., A, I, s. 3.

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HYPOCRISY AN EVIL IMPER

SONATED. A BLESSED labour, my most sovereign liege.Among this princely heap, if any here, By false intelligence, or wrong surmise, Hold me a foe; If I unwittingly, or in my rage, Have aught committed that is hardly borne By any in this presence, I desire To reconcile me to his friendly peace :

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