The Elgar Companion to Austrian Economics

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Edward Elgar Publishing, Jan 1, 1998 - Political Science - 648 pages
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'The book can be recommended both to those who know something about Austrian economics already, and to those who know nothing.' David Simpson, Economic Affairs 'Mr Boettke's very readable compendium consists of short articles by mostly you
 

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Contents

1 Introduction
1
PART I METHODOLOGY AND THEORETICAL CONCEPTS IN AUSTRIAN ECONOMICS
7
A Methodological principles
9
2 Methodological individualism
11
3 Subjectivism
17
4 Market process
23
B Philosophical background
31
5 Aristotelianism apriorism essentialism
33
45 Valuefreedom
313
46 Classical liberalism and the Austrian school
320
47 Utilitarianism
328
48 Social contract theory
337
B Public policy economics
343
49 Interventionism
345
50 The political economy of price controls
352
51 The economics of prohibition
358

6 Phenomenology and economics
38
7 Formalism in twentiethcentury economics
48
8 The interpretive turn
54
9 Causation and genetic causation in economic theory
63
10 Ideal type methodology in economics
72
11 Praxeology
77
C Concepts and principles in economic theory
85
12 Marginal utility
87
13 Cost
92
14 Competition
96
15 Entrepreneurship
103
16 Time in economics
111
17 Risk and uncertainty
118
18 Marginal productivity
123
19 Efficiency
131
20 Supply and demand
137
21 Profit and loss
143
22 The Austrian theory of price
151
23 Nonprice rivalry
156
24 The economics of information
162
25 Prices and knowledge
167
26 The boundaries of the firm
173
27 The Coase Theorem
179
28 Selforganizing systems
187
29 Invisible hand explanations
192
30 Spontaneous order
197
PART II FIELDS OF RESEARCH
207
31 Capital Theory
209
32 Austrian business cycle theory
216
33 Comparative economics systems
224
34 Financial economics
231
35 Industrial organization
244
36 International monetary theory
249
37 Labor economics
258
38 Law and economics
264
39 Legal philosophy
270
40 Public goods theory
276
41 Public choice economics
285
42 The economic theory of regulation
294
43 Resource economics
300
44 Austrian welfare economics
304
PART III APPLIED ECONOMICS AND PUBLIC POLICY
309
A Political philosophy
311
52 Economics of gender and race
362
53 The Phillips curve
372
54 Taxation
378
55 Industrial organization and the Austrian school
382
56 Advertising
389
57 Mergers and the market for corporate control
394
58 Inflation
402
59 Free Banking
408
60 The history of free banking
414
61 Financial regulation
419
62 Political Business cycles
425
63 The Great Depression
431
64 The collapse of communism and postcommunist reform
440
65 Privatization
448
PART IV HISTORY OF THOUGHT AND ALTERNATIVE SCHOOLS AND APPROACHES
455
A Classic debates
457
66 The Methodist
459
67 The debate between BohnBawerk and Hilferding
465
68 The HayekKeynes macro debate
471
69 The socialist calculation debate
478
B Precursors and alternatives
485
70 The late scholastics
487
71 German predecessors of the Austrian school
493
72 German market process theory
500
73 The Freiburg school of law and economics
508
74 Marxisms and market processes
516
75 PreKeynes macroeconomics
523
76 Austrian economics and American old institutionalism
529
77 The new institutional economics
535
78 Evolutionary economics
541
79 Austrian models? Possibilities of evolutionary computation
549
80 Social institutions and game theory
556
81 Monetarism
565
82 Supplyside economics
572
83 The New Classical economics
576
84 The new Keynesian economics
582
85 The neoRicardians
588
86 The new monetary economics
593
PART V CONCLUSION
599
87 Alternative paths forward for Austrian economics
601
Index
617
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About the author (1998)

Edited by Peter J. Boettke, University Professor of Economics and Philosophy, George Mason University, US

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