The Gentleman's Magazine, and Historical Chronicle, for the Year ..., Volume 171

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Edw. Cave, 1736-[1868], 1842 - Literature
 

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Page 13 - Sweet is the breath of morn, her rising sweet, With charm of earliest birds; pleasant the sun, When first on this delightful land he spreads His orient beams, on herb, tree, fruit, and flower, Glistering with dew; fragrant the fertile earth After soft showers; and sweet the coming on Of grateful evening
Page 6 - But know that in the Soul Are many lesser Faculties that serve Reason as chief; among these Fancy next Her office holds ; of all external things, Which the five watchful Senses represent, She forms Imaginations, Aery shapes, Which Reason joining or disjoining, frames All what we affirm or what deny, and call Our knowledge or opinion; then retires Into her private Cell when Nature rests.
Page 13 - But who the melodies of morn can tell ? The wild brook babbling down the mountain side ; The lowing herd ; the sheepfold's simple bell; The pipe of early shepherd dim descried In the lone valley; echoing far and wide The clamorous horn along the cliffs above; The hollow murmur of the ocean-tide; The hum of bees, the linnet's lay of love, And the full choir that wakes the universal grove.
Page 6 - Which Reason, joining or disjoining, frames All what we affirm or what deny, and call Our knowledge or opinion ; then retires Into her private cell, when Nature rests. Oft, in her absence, mimic Fancy wakes To imitate her ; but misjoining shapes, Wild work produces oft, and most in dreams ; 111 matching words and deeds long past or late.
Page 279 - Doubt thou the stars are fire ; Doubt that the sun doth move ; Doubt truth to be a liar ; But never doubt I love.
Page 10 - Dear lost companions of my tuneful art, Dear as the light that visits these sad eyes, Dear as the ruddy drops that warm my heart, Ye died amidst your dying country's cries — No more I weep. They do not sleep. On yonder cliffs, a...
Page 123 - Office ; thirdly, that he, during the year 1770, attended debates in the House of Lords, and took notes of speeches, particularly of the speeches of Lord Chatham ; fourthly, that he bitterly resented the appointment of Mr. Chamier to the place of Deputy Secretary at War ; fifthly, that he was bound by some strong tie to the first Lord Holland.
Page 16 - THY functions are ethereal, As if within thee dwelt a glancing mind, Organ of vision ! And a Spirit aerial Informs the cell of Hearing, dark and blind ; Intricate labyrinth, more dread for thought To enter than oracular cave...
Page 9 - Imagination is the power of depicting, and fancy of evoking and combining. The imagination is formed by patient observation; the fancy by a voluntary activity in shifting the scenery of the mind. The more accurate the imagination, the more safely may a painter, or a poet, undertake a delineation, or a description, without the presence of the objects to be characterized. The more versatile the fancy, the more original and striking will be the decorations produced.
Page 13 - With charm of earliest Birds ; pleasant the Sun When first on this delightful Land he spreads His orient Beams, on herb, tree, fruit, and flower, Glistering with dew ; fragrant the fertile earth After soft showers ; and sweet the coming on Of grateful Evening mild, then silent Night With this her solemn Bird and this fair Moon, And these the Gems of...

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