Sketches in and Around Shanghai, Etc..

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Printed at the "Shanghai Mercury" and "Celestial Empire" offices, 1894 - China - 183 pages

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Page 55 - Not in vain the distance beacons. Forward, forward let us range, Let the great world spin for ever down the ringing grooves of change.
Page ii - By and by we hear news of shipwreck in the same place, and then we are to blame if we accept it not for a rock. Upon the back of that comes out a hideous monster with fire and smoke, and then the miserable beholders are bound to take it for a cave.
Page ii - By and by, we hear news of shipwreck in the same place, and then we are to blame if we accept it not for a rock. Upon the back of that comes out a hideous monster, with fire and smoke, and then the miserable beholders arc bound to take it for a cave. While, in the mean time, two armies fly in, represented with four swords and bucklers, and then what hard heart will not receive it for a pitched field ? Now, of time they are much more liberal, for ordinary it is that two young princes fall in love.
Page 156 - When the devil was sick the devil a saint would be " When the devil was well the devil a saint was he...
Page 151 - Yang-tz', nearly a mile in •width ; from the west, and skirting the northern edge of the range of hills already mentioned, comes the river Han, narrow and canal-like, to add its quota, and serving as one of the highways of the country ; and to the northwest and north is an extensive treeless flat, so little elevated above the river that the scattered hamlets which dot its surface are without exception raised on mounds, probably artificial •works of a now distant age. A stream or two traverse...
Page 151 - Hanyang, a spectator looks down on almost as much water as land even when the rivers are low. At his feet sweeps the magnificent Yangtsze, nearly a mile in width ; from the west, and skirting the northern edge of the range of hills already mentioned, comes the river Han, narrow and canal-like, to add...
Page 128 - And I assure you this river flows so far and traverses so many countries and cities that in good sooth there pass and repass on its waters a great number of vessels, and more wealth and merchandize than on all the rivers and all the seas- of Christendom put together!
Page 128 - And you must know that this city stands on the greatest river in the world, the name of which is KIAN. It is in some places ten miles wide, in others eight, in others six, and it is more than 100 days' journey in length from one end to the other.
Page 128 - Boundless is the Ocean, bottomless the Kiang ! " NOTE 3. — " The assertion that there is a greater amount of tonnage belonging to the Chinese than to all other nations combined, does not appear overcharged to those who have seen the swarms of boats on their rivers, though it might not be found strictly true.

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