Freedom on My Mind: The Columbia Documentary History of the African American Experience

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Manning Marable
Columbia University Press, Jul 10, 2003 - History - 640 pages

Freedom on My Mind reveals the richly diverse and complex experience of black people in America in their own words, from the Colonial era of Benjamin Banneker to the present world of Kweisi Mfume and Clarence Thomas. Personal correspondence, excerpts from slave narratives and autobiographies, leaflets, significant addresses and speeches, oral histories and interviews, political manifestos, and important statements of black institutions and organizations are brought together to form a volume that testifies to the boundless creative potential of black Americans in indefatigable pursuit of the dream of freedom.

Arranged thematically, the selections illustrate the politics of resistance—as reflected through gender and sexuality, kinship and community, work and leisure, faith and spirituality. They also highlight the contributions of women to black identity, history, and consciousness, and offer excerpts from the work of some of the finest stylists in the African American canon. A general introduction as well as short introductions and bibliographies for each document further enhance the usefulness of the book for students and researchers.

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Freedom on my mind: the Columbia documentary history of the African American experience

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Compiled by Marable (director, Inst. for Research in African American Studies, Columbia Univ.), this anthology presents a well-documented perspective of the African American experience from Colonial ... Read full review

Contents

Selected Speeches by Sojourner Truth
5
The Jealous Mistress
9
Womanhood A Vital Element in the Regeneration and Progress of a Race
15
The Damnation of Women
32
Womens Most Serious Problem
47
On Being YoungA Womanand Colored
52
A Century of Progress of Negro Women
58
To All Black Women from All Black Men
63
Songs of the Prison Plantation
412
The Lynching
418
Freedom Songs
420
To Praise Our Bridges
424
The Resistant Spirit
428
Life in Prison
432
The Legacy of George Jackson
441
BBlock Days and Nightmares
445

Double Jeopardy To Be Black and Female
69
Feminism and Black Liberation
79
The Approaching Obsolescence of Housework
85
Statement of Anita Hill to the Senate Judiciary Committee October 11 1991
103
Establishing Black Feminism
110
Toward a Black Feminist Liberation Agenda Race Gender and Violence
116
Kinship and Community
127
Kidnappers
129
William J Walker To His Son 221850
132
Childhood
135
For My People
144
Ella Baker
147
Notes of a Native Son
150
Playing Hardball
162
From a Black Woman to a Black Man
170
In My Fathers House
173
Kwanzaa and the Ethics of Sharing Forging our Future in a New Era
181
Imagining the Black World
189
Poems by Phillis Wheatley
191
Argument for Colonization
194
Ethiopia
198
West India Emancipation
201
The American Negro and His Fatherland
219
Declaration of the Rights of Negro Peoples of the World
225
Heritage
234
Writings by Paul Robeson
239
Letters from Abroad
251
Selected Essays by Audre Lorde
256
The Continuity of Struggle
270
Political Economic and Social Justice
281
Political Leadership and Social Protest
283
Petitions
285
Letter to Thomas Jefferson
294
Oration on the Abolition of the Slave Trade
299
Editorial from the First Edition of Freedoms Journal
307
Men of Color To Arms
312
Speech to the Georgia Legislature
316
Nimrod Rowley to Abraham Lincoln August 1864
321
An Address Delivered at the Centennial Anniversary of the Pennsylvania Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery
324
A Letter to the Editor of the Birmingham AgeHerald
329
Of Mr Booker T Washington and Others
332
Selected Poems by Claude McKay
343
Letter from a Birmingham Jail
347
From Protest to Politics
363
The Business of America Is War and It Is Time for a Change
368
The Struggle Continues
372
In Pursuit of Justice
383
Speech on the Fugitive Slave Bill
385
Hannah Johnson to Abraham Lincoln July 311863
390
Sojourner Truth Extracts from Her Lecture on Capital Punishment
393
Lynch Law in All Its Phases
396
Work Labor and Economic Development
449
Work Songs
451
Industrial Education for the Negro
456
Harvest Song
459
Song to a Negro Washwoman
462
Why Should We March?
465
Black Boy A Record of Childhood and Youth
470
A Giant Step Toward Unity
482
All Gods Dangers
487
A Vision of Democracy
503
America
505
On American Democracy and the Negro
511
Negro Patriotism and Devotion
515
Our Democracy and the Ballot
522
The Shame of America
530
The Kind of Democracy the Negro Race Expects
546
Selected Poems by Langston Hughes
551
I Too Am American
559
The American Dream and the American Negro
563
Who Then Will Speak for the Common Good?
569
Culture Faith and Celebration
575
Popular Culture
577
Folk Tales
579
The Prize Fighter
583
The Negro Spirituals
586
The Dilemma of the Negro Author
597
It Dont Mean a Thing If It Aint Got That Swing
605
High Tide in Harlem
608
The Revolution Will Not Be Televised
614
Where Are the Films About Real Black Men and Women?
617
The Signifying Monkey
622
What America Would Be Like Without Blacks
626
O J Simpson and Our Trial by Fire
633
Faith and Spirituality
641
Spirituals
643
Spiritual Song
648
A Thanksgiving Sermon
652
Excerpt from Clotel
660
Excerpt from A Brand Plucked from the Fire
671
An Antebellum Sermon
677
Writings by Fenton Johnson
681
Go Down Death
687
Faith Hasnt Got No Eyes
691
Salvation
695
The Most Durable Power
698
Black Theology and Black Power
701
The Black Church and Socialist Politics
709
A Torchlight for America
716
Index
722
Acknowledgments
727
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About the author (2003)

Manning Marable is director of the Institute for Research in African American studies and professor of history at Columbia University. He edited Dispatches from the Ebony Tower (Columbia, 2000) and is the author of Black Leadership (Columbia, 1998);W.E.B. Du Bois: Black Radical Democrat; and Speaking Truth to Power: Essays on Race, Resistance, and Radicalism among other books. He lives in New York City.

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