Tom Bowling

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Page 316 - But now he's gone aloft. Tom never from his word departed, His virtues were so rare; His friends were many and true-hearted, His Poll was kind and fair: And then he'd sing so blithe and jolly; Ah, many's the time and oft! But mirth is turned to melancholy, For Tom is gone aloft. Yet shall poor Tom find pleasant weather, When He, who all commands, Shall give, to call life's crew together, The word to pipe all hands.
Page 84 - I joined the Hinchinbroke, and succeeded Lord Nelson, who was promoted to a larger ship ; but he had received the infection of the climate before he went from the port, and had a fever, from which he could not recover until he quitted his ship and went to England. . My constitution resisted many attacks, and I survived most of my ship's company, having buried in four months 180 of the 200 who composed it. Mine was not a singular case, for every ship that was long there suffered in the same degree....
Page 202 - Poor child of danger, nursling of the storm, Sad are the woes that wreck thy manly form ! Rocks, waves, and winds, the shatter'd bark delay ; Thy heart is sad, thy home is far away.
Page 196 - Plym ; her hardy veterans linger out the last remains of life in Greenwich, or a poor-house ; the works of the historian become vapid and uninteresting ; and naval novels are made the vehicles of knowledge, and are the last embers of history raked together to keep the navy before the eyes of the public : thus is Tom Bowling's career made to embody the services of many of the greatest men our navy has produced.
Page 272 - Man, proud man, Drest in a little brief authority, Plays such fantastic tricks before high Heaven As make the angels weep.
Page 77 - The transports' men all died, and some of the ships, having none left to take care of them, sunk in the harbour: but transport ships were not wanted, for the troops...
Page 76 - Hinchinbroke was, in the spring of 1780, employed on an expedition to the Spanish main, where it was proposed to pass into the South Sea, by a navigation of boats along the river San Juan, and the lakes Nicaragua and Leon. The plan was formed without a sufficient knowledge of the country, which presented difficulties not to be surmounted by human skill or perseverance. It was dangerous to proceed on the river, from the rapidity of the current, and the numerous falls over rocks which intercepted the...
Page 315 - TOM BOWLING HERE, a sheer hulk, lies poor Tom Bowling, The darling of our crew; No more he'll hear the tempest howling, For Death has broached him to. His form was of the manliest beauty. His heart was kind and soft ; Faithful below he did his duty, But now he's gone aloft.
Page 196 - Dispatch. after day blots out from the list of life men who have fought and bled for their country, and who are forgotten by the rising generation. The navy—England's hope and firmest stay, rots gradually in the Medway and the Plym ; her hardy veterans linger out the last remains of life in Greenwich, or a poor-house; the works of the historian become vapid and uninteresting ; and naval novels are made the vehicles of knowledge, and are the last embers of history raked together to keep the navy...
Page 245 - It was impossible for any man to have looked at Captain Bowling without admiration; he was, as the song says, "of the manliest beauty," and his large eye, quick and clear, seemed to pass every object in review before him. His brother officers knew his value well, and although he had very little acquaintance with them personally, yet his name was familiar in every...

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