Medieval Schools: From Roman Britain to Renaissance England

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Yale University Press, 2006 - Education - 430 pages
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Children have gone to school in England since Roman times. By the end of the middle ages there were hundreds of schools, supporting a highly literate society. This book traces their history from the Romans to the Renaissance, showing how they developed, what they taught, how they were run, and who attended them.
Every kind of school is covered, from reading schools in churches and town grammar schools to schools in monasteries and nunneries, business schools, and theological schools. The author also shows how they fitted into a constantly changing world, ending with the impacts of the Renaissance and the Reformation.
Medieval schools anticipated nearly all the ideas, practices, and institutions of schooling today. Their remarkable successes in linguistic and literary work, organizational development, teaching large numbers of people shaped the societies that they served. Only by understanding what schools achieved can we fathom the nature of the middle ages.
 

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User Review  - cemanuel - LibraryThing

In this book Nicholas Orme sets out to correct the common misperception that schools during the Medieval period were almost exclusively for clergy and that they were primitive institutions, where ... Read full review

Contents

The Study of Medieval Schools
3
From the Romans to 1100
15
The Tower of Learning
53
The Teaching of Grammar
86
The Schoolroom
128
The Schoolmaster
163
Schools from 1100 to 1350
189
Schools from 1350 to 1530
218
The Religious Orders and Education
255
The Reign of Henry VI11
288
From Edward VI to Elizabeth I
312
A List of Schools in England and Wales 10661530
346
Notes
373
Bibliography
397
ndex
412
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About the author (2006)

Nicholas Orme is professor of history, University of Exeter. He has published extensively on medieval religious, cultural, literary, and social history, especially the history of education.

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