Report of the Committee of the African Institution, Volume 5

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Printed by Ellerton and Henderson, 1811 - Slave trade
 

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Page 28 - Treaty, it shall not be lawful for any of the Subjects of the Crown of Spain to purchase Slaves, or to carry on the Slave Trade, on any part of the Coast of Africa, to the North of the Equator, upon any pretext or in any manner whatever...
Page 12 - ... difficult to consider the prohibitory law of America in any other light than as one of those municipal regulations of a foreign state of which this court could not take any cognizance. But by the alteration which has since taken place, the question stands on different grounds, and is open to the application of very different principles. The slave trade has since been totally abolished by this country, and our legislature has pronounced it to be contrary to the principles of justice and humanity.
Page 47 - Purpose of his, her or their being carried away, conveyed or removed as a Slave or Slaves, or for the Purpose of his, her or their being imported or brought as a Slave or Slaves into any Island, Colony, Country, Territory or Place whatsoever, or for the Purpose of his, her or their being sold, transferred, used or dealt...
Page 20 - The principle laid down in that case appears to be, that the slave trade carried on by a vessel belonging to a subject of the United States is a trade which, being unprotected by the domestic regulations of their legislature and government, subjects the vessel engaged in it to a sentence of condemnation.
Page 116 - February 1810, declared his determination to co-operate with his Britannic Majesty in the cause of humanity and justice, by adopting the most efficacious means for bringing about a gradual Abolition of the Slave Trade...
Page 51 - Army ; and moreover, it shall and may be lawful for all Governors or Persons having the Chief Command, Civil or Military, of any of the Colonies, Settlements, Forts or Factories belonging to His Majesty...
Page 46 - ... as a slave or slaves, or for the purpose of his, her, or their being imported or brought as a slave or slaves, into any island, colony, country, territory, or place whatsoever, or for the purpose of his, her, or their being sold, transferred, used, or dealt with as a slave or slaves, or...
Page 50 - An Act to facilitate the Performance of the Duties of Justices of the Peace out of Sessions within England and Wales with respect to summary Convictions and Orders...
Page 85 - Majesty's government. It might have been hoped that the fear of disgrace attendant on an outrage of humanity so publicly exhibited, would have been sufficient, in any civilized country, for its prevention; but it never could have been supposed possible that so flagrant a violation of the clanse of the Act, called ' the Melioration Act,' could be submitted to the cognizance of a court of justice, and be exempted from the punishment which the judge is empowered to inflict on conviction of the offender.
Page 16 - Madeira was a fraudulent and collusive transaction ; and this suspicion was afterwards fully confirmed : and it clearly appeared, from the mere inspection of the vessel, independently of other corroborating circumstances, that the object of the voyage was to procure a cargo of Slaves on the coast of Africa. The judgment of the Court, delivered by the Right Hon. Sir William Scott, on the 12th of March 1811, was to the following effect. " This ship, bearing the Portuguese flag, was taken and brought...

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