An Unsuitable Job for a Woman

Front Cover
Simon and Schuster, Apr 17, 2012 - Fiction - 256 pages
An Unsuitable Job for a Woman introduces bestselling mystery author P.D. James’s courageous but vulnerable young detective, Cordelia Gray, in a “top-rated puzzle of peril that holds you all the way” (The New York Times).

Handsome Cambridge dropout Mark Callender died hanging by the neck with a faint trace of lipstick on his mouth. When the official verdict is suicide, his wealthy father hires fledgling private investigator Cordelia Gray to find out what led him to self-destruction. What she discovers instead is a twisting trail of secrets and sins, and the strong scent of murder.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - danhammang - LibraryThing

This was a 1973 Edgar nominee but, no worries. Even at that point James was a successful, much decorated author. This clever, satisfying tale features Cordelia Grey but James' beloved Dagleish hovers ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - caanderson - LibraryThing

It’s smart and moves along at a good pace. Love the MC, Cordelia Gray. Being written in another country always gives me a different perspective on how books are written. I’ll be looking for more of Miss Gray books. Read full review

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Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
9
Section 2
13
Section 3
52
Section 4
90
Section 5
134
Section 6
175
Section 7
193
Section 8
235
Section 9
251
Section 10
254
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

P. D. James (1920–2014) was born in Oxford in 1920. She worked in the National Health Service and the Home Office From 1949 to 1968, in both the Police Department and Criminal Policy Department. All that experience was used in her novels. She won awards for crime writing in Britain, America, Italy, and Scandinavia, including the Mystery Writers of America Grandmaster Award and the National Arts Club Medal of Honour for Literature. She received honorary degrees from seven British universities, was awarded an OBE in 1983 and was created a life peer in 1991.

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