Poetical Works, Volume 2

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Princeton University Press, 2001 - Literary Criticism - 1439 pages
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Poetry in its many guises is at the center of Coleridge's multifarious interests, and this long-awaited new edition of his complete poetical works marks the pinnacle of the Bollingen Collected Coleridge. The three parts of Volume 16 confirm and expand the sense of the Coleridge who has emerged over the past half-century, with implications for English Romantic writing as a whole. Setting new standards of comprehensiveness in the presentation of Romantic texts, they will interest historians and editorial theorists, as well as readers and students of poetry. They represent a work of truly monumental importance.


The second part presents the same 706 poems as the first, in the same chronological sequence, but differently records in each case all known textual information in collated form--allowing for alternative construals of the reading texts. An additional 135 items are inserted into the same sequence, comprising poems mistakenly ascribed to Coleridge or of dubious authenticity and poems that remained only in the planning stage or that are referred to but have not been recovered. The index of titles and first lines incorporates the full range of variants.


All told, the Collected Coleridge variorum sequence collates over a third more additional texts--in more detailed and accurate form--than those found in the previous standard edition, by E.H. Coleridge. The presentation method in this second part will interest editorial theorists as well as those interested primarily in Coleridge and/or the making of poetry. The unusually detailed textual information also reveals changes in such areas as linguistic and grammatical usage, patterns of transcription and circulation among anthologists, and contemporary publishers' house styles.


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Contents

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS XXV11
757
Lessing
769
Epigram to a Critic Who Extracted a Passage from a Poem
773
Names from Lessing
774
Always Audible from Kastner
776
Over the Door of a Cottage after Logau
777
The Devil Outwitted or Jobs Luck after Logau and John Owen
778
Epigram on the Speed with Which Jack Writes Verses after von Halem
780
Latin Version
1059
An Anagram of Mary Morgans Face
1061
A FillASophaCol Note
1062
On a Happy Household
1063
Latin Lines to Accompany a Second Emblem
1064
Latin Elegiacs on Guy Fawkes
1065
Sonnet Translated from Marino
1066
X2 Twentysixline Poem
1067

Epigram on a Bad Singer after Pfeffel and Martial
781
Epigram on a Joke without a Sting
782
To a Living Ninon dEnclos
783
Epigram on a Maiden More Sentimental than Chaste
784
Epigram on a Supposed Son
786
Lines Composed in a Concertroom
787
Hexametrical Translation of Psalm 46
790
To Delia
791
Epigrams from Lessing
792
Love
793
Ode to Georgiana Duchess of Devonshire on the 24th Stanza in her Passage over Mount Gothard
807
The Song of Deborah Translated
811
Hexametrical Version of Isaiah
812
Hymn to the Earth from Stolberg
813
To a Cataract from a Cavern near the Summit of a Mountain Precipice from Stolberg
814
Tells Birthplace Imitated from Stolberg
816
X1 Fortyline Poem on William Tell
817
VII
819
On Candles Being Introduced While a Young Lady was Singing
820
X2 Verses Sent to The Morning Post
822
up a Steep Hill Facing the South
835
Liquors Comprised under the Name of Ale
847
Lines on the Breeze and Hope
861
Sonnet to Asra
900
Epigram Addressed to One Who Published in Print What Had Been Entrusted to Him by my Fireside from Wemicke
942
On the Curious Circumstance that in the German Language the Sun is Feminine and the Moon Masculine after Wernicke
943
Epigram on Spots in the Sun from Wernicke
944
Epigram on Surface from Wernicke
945
A Dialogue between an Author and his Friend after Wernicke
946
Epigram on Possession from a German Original
947
Epigram on Castles in the Air from Wernicke
948
To a Vain Lady from the German and from Martial
949
Epigram to my Candle after Wernicke
950
From an Old German Poet after Wernicke
951
Epigram on Bond Street Bucks Adapted from Wernicke
952
Mcopoooqna or Wisdom in Folly from a German Original?
953
Westphalian Song
954
Latin Lines to William Sotheby
955
Epigram on Zoilus from Opitz
956
X1 Stanzas Written after a Long Absence
958
Greek Lines on Achilles Meal of Yesterday
959
The Kiss and the Blush
960
Grasmere in Sunshine
961
Three Lines from the Bristol Notebook
962
Three Lines on Loch Lomond
963
Lines Written at Dove Cottage
970
A Fragment
977
X1 Further Lines on The Soother of Absence
986
Closing Lines in Notebook 21
992
X1 Twenty Lines Inscribed in The Poems ofOssian
993
Doleful Dialogue
994
Curtailed Lines in Notebook 17
995
Apostrophe to Beauty in Malta
996
Irregular Lines on the Sick Mans Comforter
997
Lines on Hearing a Tale
998
X1 Lines on Leaving the Mediterranean
999
On the Names in a Malta Notebook
1001
Latin Lines to William Wordsworth as Judge
1002
On the Name Chastenut Grove Derived from Ariosto
1003
On Fetid Who Died of a Catarrh
1004
On the Family Vault of the Burrs
1005
Lines Written in a Dream
1007
Written at Ossaia
1008
Lines Rewritten from Spensers Epithalamium
1009
Farewell to Love
1010
An Allegory
1011
Two Epigrams on Pitt and Fox
1014
Adapted from Fulke Greville s Alaham
1016
A Greek Song Set to Music and Sung by Hartley Coleridge Esqrc Grecologian Philometrist and Philomelist
1017
Verses to Derwent Coleridge Accompanying Greek Lessons
1019
The Blossoming of the Solitary Datetree
1021
Lines Written in NovemberDecember 1806
1026
Written at Coleorton
1027
A Line Written at Coleorton
1028
Psyche or The Butterfly
1036
A Metrical Conclusion?
1038
Lines on the Yellowhammer
1039
Allegorical Description
1040
Three Lines on Penitence
1041
Birds in May
1042
On the Roots of a Tree
1046
X1 Poems Suggested by Richard Herne Shepherd from The Courier
1047
Ned calls his wife his counterpart
1048
Between Concurrences of Fate
1049
Translation of a Distich by Schiller
1050
On Tom Pooles Meanderings
1051
The Barberrytree
1052
Versified from Bacon
1053
A Wanderers Farewell
1054
Thinking Merrily Alone
1055
A Line from a Lost Poem?
1056
For Hartley and Derwent
1057
Ad Vilmum Axiologum
1058
A Fragment
1068
Lines on the Moon
1070
Couplet on Singing in Church
1071
To Mr Amphlett
1072
Another Epitaph on an Infant
1073
A Motto Adapted from Loves Labours Lost
1074
Threeline Fragment
1075
For a Clock in a Marketplace
1076
Verses Based on Paracelsus
1077
X1 The Good Old Customs
1079
Couplet Written in Autumn 1809
1080
Adaptation of Lines from Daniels Civil Wars
1081
Separation after Charles Cotton
1082
Lines Altered from Fulke Grevilles A Treatise of Humane Learning
1083
Fulke Greville Modified
1084
Further Lines on Tranquillity
1085
The Visionary Hope
1086
Fragment in Blank Verse
1087
Gilbert White Versified on the Owl
1088
Translation of a Goethe Epigram
1089
The Moon on the Pacific Main
1090
On the First Poem in Donnes Book
1091
Stanzas
1102
Versified Note to J J Morgan
1115
X4 Shakespeare Read Creatively
1121
X1 Puff and Slander
1133
X2 Napoleon
1139
To the Morgans
1143
Lines on Superstition
1144
Lines Headed Orpheus
1145
Further Lines Adapted from Jean Paul
1146
Elevated Diarrhoea
1147
Alternative Translation of Virgils Bucolics
1148
Lines after Punch
1149
To a Young Lady Complaining of a Corn
1151
Fancy in Nubibus
1152
Imitated from Aristophanes
1154
Part of a Sonnet to Miss Bullock
1155
Rewriting of Lines by Beaumont and Fletcher
1158
A Description of a Nightingale
1159
Three Epigrams on Bishop Watson
1160
Couplet on the Heart Deaf and Blind
1161
Adaptation of Daniels Musophilus
1162
A Further Adaptation of Daniels Musophilus
1163
Draft Fragment Perhaps Describing Sara Coleridge
1164
Lines on the Usury of Pain
1165
Distich Written in February 1819
1166
Beareth all things
1167
A Character
1170
Extempore Specimen of the Pun Polysyllabic
1175
Extempore to Charles Mathews
1176
Couplet on Anticipation and Theory Genius and Cleverness
1177
Greek Couplet on Lauderdale
1178
A Practical Problem concerning Flies
1179
A Couplet Addressed to the Minds Ear
1180
Where is Reason?
1181
Adapted from HOlty
1182
Lines from the BhagavadGita from Creuzer
1183
Mock Epitaph on Sir William Curtis
1184
Lines Recorded by Thomas Allsop
1185
A Poem upon Nothing
1186
Nonsense Sapphics Written for James Gillman Jr
1187
586
1191
593
1207
598
1223
607
1231
Stanzas Addressed to a Lady
1239
Poems
1261
X1 A Sober Statement of Human Life
1271
Romance or Tale of the Dark Age
1281
X1 Long Poem on the Rhine
1298
Donne by the Filter
1319
An Elegiac PlusquamSesquiSonnet to my
1328
The Hunger of Liars
1347
An Allegoric Romance
1348
Oh might I but my Patrick love
1353
O sing and be glad
1354
To the Young Artist Kayser of Kayserwerth
1355
From a Manuscript Poem of Athanasius Sphinx
1358
S T C
1359
S T Coleridge Etat Sua 63
1364
Lines on Lady Mary Shepherd
1365
Other Lines on Lady Mary Shepherd
1366
On an Ellipsis of John Kenyons
1367
E Ccelo Descendit rvwGi lecunov
1368
Splendida Bills
1369
Suggested Alterations in Thomas Pringles African Sketches
1371
Lines on George doys Apocalypse
1372
To Miss Fanny Boyce
1373
Written on Receiving Letters Informing Me of the Birth of a Son I Being at Birmingham
1374
433A Lines to Charlotte Brent
1375
INDEX OF TITLES AND FIRST LINES
1377
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

Born in Ottery St. Mary, England, in 1772, Samuel Taylor Coleridge studied revolutionary ideas at Cambridge before leaving to enlist in the Dragoons. After his plans to start a communist society in the United States with his friend Robert Southey, later named poet laureate of England, were botched, Coleridge instead turned his attention to teaching and journalism in Bristol. Coleridge married Southey's sister-in-law Sara Fricker, and they moved to Nether Stowey, where they became close friends with William and Dorothy Wordsworth. From this friendship a new poetry emerged, one that focused on Neoclassic artificiality. In later years, their relationship became strained, partly due to Coleridge's moral collapse brought on by opium use, but more importantly because of his rejection of Wordworth's animistic views of nature. In 1809, Coleridge began a weekly paper, The Friend, and settled in London, writing and lecturing. In 1816, he published Kubla Kahn. Coleridge reported that he composed this brief fragment, considered by many to be one of the best poems ever written lyrically and metrically, while under the influence of opium, and that he mentally lost the remainder of the poem when he roused himself to answer an ill-timed knock at his door. Coleridge's The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, Christabel, and his sonnet Ozymandias are all respected as inventive and widely influential Romantic pieces. Coleridge's prose works, especially Biographia Literaria, were also broadly read in his day. Coleridge died in 1834.

Mays is Head of the English Department, University of Dublin.

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