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LETTERS AND DESPATCHES

OF

LORD CASTLEREAGH.

1813 CONTINUED. ALLIANCE OF NATIONS AGAINST FRANCE;

CAMPAIGN IN GERMANY; EXPULSION OF THE FRENCH FROM THE EMPIRE.

The Hon. Sir Charles Stewart to Lord Castlereagh.

Draft. Hanover, January 2, 1813.

My Lord—The moment previous to my departure from Kiel, Barou de Wetterstedt put into my hands the correspondence that had taken place on the part of General Baron Tavast, who had been sent to Copenhagen by H.R.H. the Prince Royal since the arrival of the former in Denmark. As these papers are very interesting, and as they bring the state of the negociations up to the time of my leaving the Swedish head-quarters, I think it worth while to forward copies from hence to your lordship, although perhaps Mr. Thornton may also remit them.

The extreme alarm that the conduct of Austria in this negotiation has created in the Prince Royal's mind will not easily be allayed, and I cannot help believing that no negociation begun on a basis so evidently rotten as this appeared to mo long since to have been will ever be attended with favourable results. The Austrian Minister seems to have supposed ho

VOL. IX. B

doubt the Prince Royal would have availed himself of such a stress on my part to declare Great Britain was deserting him, as well as Austria deceiving him, and he might at once have turned round. I hope, therefore, your lordship will think 1 have done as much as I could, under the present critical aspect of affairs.

The differences have been so great between the Prince Royal and General Walmoden, that I am afraid they will never go on smoothly. The latter is not of a contented disposition, and the former is by no means an easy character to act with. But to find a remedy at such a crisis is not so easy. Great decisions must be made by the great Allied Powers at headquarters. To soften differences and to make the machine go on as well as we are able, notwithstanding all the impediments that arise, must be the duty of all employed as myself. I have cautioned General Walmoden, whom I met here, against encouraging the Duke of Cambridge to augment the difficulties in his own mind with which he has to contend. I do not diminish them; they are undoubtedly great. Still, his Royal Highness's great attention, experience, and ability, will very shortly overcome them. Time is all that is required, and to keep his Royal Highness up to the mark. The counsels of either General Walmoden or Decken are not very inspiring; and if I might venture to make a suggestion, it would be that the duke should be armed with the feeling that he ought to take more responsibility on himself; and with this I am persuaded business would go on much better, as bis Royal Highness is more able than those who surround him.

I have the honour to be, &c

The Hon. Sir Charles Stewart to Mr. Edward Cooke.

Berlin, April 22, 1813. Dear Cooke—Since closing my private letters to Castlereagh, I hear from Mr. Jackson, who has been out this evening, that he has seen Hatzfeldt, who is just returned from his mission to Paris. He was sent there, as you will remember, to explain

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