Egyptian Magic

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In this classic work, first published in 1899, one of the most prolific Egyptologists of the Victorian era offers his renowned insight into the magical power names, spells, and talismans held for the ancient Egyptians. How did beliefs that predated the worship of deities come to become associated with controlling gods and goddesses? How did magical amulets ward off evil spirits? What role did scarabs serve in bestowing immortality?The writings of E.A. Wallis Budge are considered somewhat controversial today because of his use of an archaic system of translation, but useful illustrations and an abundance of information make them necessary works for students of ancient civilizations as well as those of the evolution of historical study. This entertaining overview of the connection between religion and magic in ancient Egypt remain a vital resource today.SIR E.A. WALLIS BUDGE (1857-1934) was curator of Egyptian and Assyrian antiquities at the British Museum form 1894 to 1924. Among his many works of translation and studies of ancient Egyptian religion and ritual is his best-known project, The Egyptian Book of the Dead.

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Contents

I
1
II
25
III
65
IV
104
V
157
VI
182
VII
206
Copyright

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Page 7 - And Moses stretched out his hand over the sea; and the LORD caused the sea to go back by a strong east wind all that night, and made the sea dry land, and the waters were divided. And the children of Israel went into the midst of the sea upon the dry ground: and the waters were a wall unto them on their right hand, and on their left.
Page 7 - And Moses stretched forth his hand over the sea, and the sea returned to his strength when the morning appeared; and the Egyptians fled against it; and the Lord overthrew the Egyptians in the midst of the sea. And the waters returned and covered the chariots, and the horsemen, and all the host of Pharaoh that came into the sea after them; there remained not so much as one of them.
Page 139 - I was going through the two regions of my lands according to my heart's desire, to see that which I had created, when lo ! I was bitten by a serpent which I saw not. Is it fire ? Is it water ? I am colder than water, 1 am hotter than fire.
Page 30 - Memphis). I understand with my heart. I have gained the mastery over my heart, I have gained the mastery over my two hands, I have gained the mastery over my legs, I have gained the power to do whatsoever my ka (double) pleaseth.
Page 43 - The blood of Isis, and the strength of Isis, and the " words of power of Isis shall be mighty to act as " powers to protect this great and divine being, and to " guard him from him that would do unto him anything " that he holdeth in abomination.
Page 140 - Bull of his mother," from whom spring the delights of love. I have made the heavens, I have stretched out the two horizons like a curtain, and I have placed the soul of the gods within them. I am he who, if he openeth his eyes, doth make the light, and, if he closeth them, darkness cometh into being. At his command the Nile riseth, and the gods know not his name. I have made the hours, I have created the days, I bring forward the festivals of the year, I create the Nile-flood. I make the fire of...
Page 215 - Miamun, in. the year of his elevation to the throne of Egypt and Ethiopia, dreamed that he saw two serpents ; one on his right hand and the other on his left.
Page 65 - ... the substance of which it was made lasted, if the name, or emblem, or picture was not erased from it. But the Egyptians went a step further than this, and they believed that it was possible to transmit to the figure of any man, or woman, or animal, or living creature, the soul of the being which it represented, and its qualities and attributes. The...
Page 141 - Depart poison, go forth from Ra. O eye of Horus, go forth from the god, and shine outside his mouth. It is I who work, it is I who make to fall down upon the earth the vanquished poison ; for the name of the great god hath been taken away from him.
Page 185 - O sweet-smelling soul of the great god, thou dost contain such a sweet odour that thy face shall neither change nor perish . . . Thy members shall become young in Arabia, and thy soul shall appear over thy body in Ta-neter (ie, the 'divine land').

About the author (2005)

E.A. Wallis Budge, 1857 - 1934 Budge was the Curator of Egyptian and Assyrian Antiquities at the British Museum from 1894 to 1924. He was also a Sometime Scholar of Christ's College, a scholar at the University of Cambridge, Tyrwhitt, and a Hebrew Scholar. He collected a large number of Coptic, Greek, Arabic, Syriac, Ethiopian, and Egyptian Papyri manuscripts. He was involved in numerous archaeology digs in Egypt, Mesopotamia and the Sudan. Budge is known for translating the Egyptian Book of the Dead, which is also known as The Papyrus of Ani. He also analyzed many of the practices of Egyptian religion, language and ritual. His written works consisted of translated texts and hieroglyphs and a complete dictionary of hieroglyphs. Budge's published works covered areas of Egyptian culture ranging from Egyptian religion, Egyptian mythology and magical practices. He was knighted in 1920. E.A. Wallis Budge died on November 23, 1934 in London, England.

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