Notes on the West Indies: written during the expedition under the command of the late General Sir Ralph Abercromby; including observations on the island of Barbadoes, and the settlements captured by the British troops, upon the coast of Guiana; likewise remarks relating to the Creoles and slaves of the western colonies, and the Indians of South America; with occasional hints, regarding the seasoning or yellow fever of hot climates, Volume 1

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, and Orme, 1806 - Anglo-French War, 1793-1802
 

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Page 283 - How us to pass on, without devoting to them a moment of particular regard. We, therefore, went a little off the road to approach them nearer; when we found that they were labouring with the hoe, to dig, or cut up the ground, preparatory to the planting of sugar ; and that a stout robust looking man, apparently white, was following them, holding a whip at their backs.
Page 283 - Curiosity, would not allow us to pass on without devoting to them a moment of particular regard. We, therefore, went a little off the road to approach them nearer; when we found that they were labouring with the hoe, to dig, or cut up the ground, preparatory to the planting of sugar ; and that a stout robust-looking man, apparently white, was following them, holding a whip at their backs.
Page 299 - ... side, fell down upon her knees, and with her calabash emptied all the water out of the hole, then immersing the taper in the deep void, she suddenly set the whole pit in a flame, when she instantly jumped upon her legs and looked significantly round, as if anxious to catch the surprise expressed upon our countenances from the workings of her witchcraft. The taper being removed, the empty space continued to burn with a soft lambent flame without the appearance of any thing to support the combustion....
Page 273 - When the whole of the earth was replaced several of the women, who had staid to chant, in merry song, over poor Jenny's clay, took up a handful of the mould, and threw it down again upon the grave of their departed friend, as the finishing of the ceremony, crying aloud "God bless you, fenny!
Page 264 - They aflemble, in crowds, upon the open green, or in any fquare or corner of the town, and, forming a ring in the centre of the throng, dance to the found of their beloved mufic, and the finging of their favorite African yell.
Page 271 - Instead of weeping* and bewailing, the followers jumped and sported as thev passed along, and talked and laughed with each other in high festivity. The procession was closed by five robust negro fishermen, who followed behind playing antic gambols, and dancing all the way to the grave.
Page 196 - The two points of land, at the entrance, ferve as a defence; while they augment the beauty of the harbour. On one of them appears a formidable battery, together with an extenfive barrack for troops: on the other is a fine grove of mountain cabbage, and coco nut 196 trees.
Page 56 - too great a fool to keep the deck" This introduced a very ludicrous fcene between Jack and the clown.
Page 258 - I. ft regard to decency either of manner, or perfon. Their bodies were naked, fave a bit of blue cloth folded round the loins, and brought between the legs, from behind, to fatten before. As they ftooped down, to dip the linen in the river, many of them expofed the crowded and callous efcars of repeated...
Page 20 - Thou hast full leave to tread upon a thorn. Yet some there are, of men I think the worst, Poor imps! unhappy if they can't be curs'd; For ever brooding over mis'ry's eggs...

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